School of Medicine


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  • Fumiaki Ikeno

    Fumiaki Ikeno

    Program Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign, Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Program Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University


    Dr. Ikeno is a Research Associate, Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University. In this role, he is responsible for pre clinical studies including GLP for medical devices and also regenerative medicines for cardiovascular diseases. Currently, he is devoting himself to the international regulatory project between Japan and the United States, also known as "Harmonization by Doing", whose focus is to collaborate with regulatory agencies such as FDA, PMDA/MHLW, academia and industries for improving the regulatory process in the 2 largest medtech markets. Dr. Ikeno also devoted himself to found Japan biodesign program which is a collaborative program with University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tohoku University, Japan Federation Medical Device Association, Ministry of Education Japan and Stanford biodesign program. Currently, Dr. Ikeno serves as the Program Director (US) for Japan Biodesign. Dr. Ikeno is co-founder and board member of US-Japan MedTech Frontier which is a non-profit cooperate to make a trans-pacific eco-system of medical device between Japan and USA.

    After 9 years clinical practice as an interventional cardiologist and Family Doctor in rural areas of Japan, Dr. Ikeno came to Stanford as a Researcher and completed his Biodesign Certificate Program. Being part of the ecosystem in Silicon Valley, Dr. Ikeno participated in more than 200 medtech projects and 50 GLP studies as well as in the analysis of clinical trials for cardiovascular medicine (BARI2D, FAME, ReOPEN etc). His other academic consortium projects include Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, Global Consensus Working Group of Optical Coherence Tomography, and Japan-US consensus document for the treatment of critical limb ischemia.

    Over the last decade, Dr. Ikeno has served as an advisor for medical device industries and currently serves as a chief medical officer of an incubation fund specific for medtech (Medventure Partners, Inc, Tokyo) as a spin-off from Innovation Network Corporation of Japan (INCJ) that is the largest government and private partnership fund in Japan. He is also serving as a chair of cardiovascular working group of APAN (Asian Pacific Advanced Network) that contributes the remote education, research activities, and tele-health using a specialized internet network. Dr.Ikeno is also serving as consulting faculty/lecturer roles in several universities in Japan including University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tsukuba University etc. Dr. Ikeno has authored over 70 peer reviewed publications and textbooks and has been invited to lecture at international medical conferences. Dr. Ikeno is a council member of U.S.- Japan Council which is a non-profit organization by Japanese American. He is serving as a mentor for START-X MED which is an accelerating program for Stanford related entrepreneurs in medical fields.

    Contact Information


    Falk CVRC CV007
    300 Pasteur Drive
    Palo Alto, CA 94305-5406

  • Cristiana Iosef

    Cristiana Iosef

    Basic Life Science Research Scientist, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Cristiana Iosef returned to Stanford University Medical School in Feb 2019, after serving for five years, as a research associate professor of Pharmacology, in the Nevada State University. Enthusiastically, Cristiana joined Dr Michael Fischbein’s research program in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and she will focus on the molecular cues leading to vascular aneurysms. The long-term goal is to design high precision personalized therapies based on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) aimed to restore the defective signaling pathways associated with cardio-vascular pathologies, or to predict their evolution. This collaboration started in 2010 while being a member of the Stanford/Pediatrics Department (Alvira lab) and yielded an important publication: Merk DR, Chin JT, Dake BA, Maegdefessel L, Miller MO, Kimura N, Tsao PS, Iosef C, Berry GJ, Mohr FW, Spin JM, Alvira CM, Robbins RC, Fischbein MP. miR-29b participates in early aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome. Circ Res. 2012 Jan 20;110(2):312-24. Dr Iosef is a dvm-surgeon and molecular signaling expert and she began her research career as a Fulbright Graduate Scholar in Washington University School of Medicine (St Louis, MO). She continued to specialize in animal models for human medicine practice in the Ohio State University. Prior to joining Stanford University in 2010, Cristiana developed an important body of work on signal-transduction and proteomic profiling of placental mesenchymal stem cells, in the University of Western Ontario, Canada (2001-10). In addition to her academic duties, Cristiana served as an associate director of the Mountain West Clinical Translational Research Consortium (2016-19). When she is not in the lab, Dr Iosef can be found hiking on the Pacific coast, skiing in the Sierras, visiting art galleries or she may study for her brown-belt exam in martial arts at JKA Shotokan Stanford. Aside from being a devoted vet-surgeon scientist, Cristiana is the proud mom of a young corporate lawyer.

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