School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 253 Results

  • Stephanie Harman

    Stephanie Harman

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Harman graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. She then completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Stanford and a Palliative Care fellowship at the Palo Alto VA/Stanford program before joining the faculty at Stanford. She is the founding medical director of Palliative Care Services for Stanford Health Care and a 2017 Cambia Sojourns Scholar Leader Awardee. She is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and a faculty member in the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics. She serves as the clinical section chief of Palliative Care in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health and co-chairs the Stanford Health Care Ethics Committee. Her research and educational interests include communication training in healthcare, bioethics in end-of-life care, and the application of machine learning to improve access to palliative care.

  • Keren Haroush

    Keren Haroush

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies the mechanisms by which highly complex behaviors are mediated at the neuronal level, mainly focusing on the example of dynamic social interactions and the neural circuits that drive them. From dyadic interactions to group dynamics and collective decision making, the lab seeks a mechanistic understanding for the fundamental building blocks of societies, such as cooperation, empathy, fairness and reciprocity.

  • Ciara Harraher, MD

    Ciara Harraher, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in medical education and I am an Associate in the Practice of Medicine and doctoring with CARE ( E4C) Program. I am also interested in surgical outcomes research and I am involved in clinical trials studying brain tumors and stroke. I have also presented internationally on issues related to improving diversity in Neurosurgery.

  • Robert Harrington

    Robert Harrington

    Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine

    Bio Dr. Robert A. Harrington is an interventional cardiologist and the Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University. Dr. Harrington was previously the Richard Sean Stack, MD Distinguished Professor and the Director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) at Duke University. His research interests include evaluating antithrombotic therapies to treat acute ischemic heart disease and to minimize the acute complications of percutaneous coronary procedures, studying the mechanism of disease of the acute coronary syndromes, understanding the issue of risk stratification in the care of patients with acute ischemic coronary syndromes, building local, national and international collaborations for the efficient conduct of innovative clinical research and trying to better understand and improve upon the methodology of clinical research. His research has been extensively funded through NIH, NIA, other peer reviewed agencies and private industry. Committed to training and mentorship, Harrington has served as the principal mentor for more than 20 post-doctoral clinical research fellows focused on cardiovascular research.

    He has authored more than 640 peer-reviewed manuscripts, reviews, book chapters, and editorials. Thomson Reuters lists him as one of the most cited investigators in clinical medicine from 2002-2014. He is a deputy editor of JAMA Cardiology and an editorial board member for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. He has served as editor of five textbooks and is a senior editor of the 13th and 14th editions of Hurst’s The Heart, one of the leading textbooks of cardiovascular medicine. He has been a member of the NHLBI’s Clinical Trials Study Section and the IOM’s Working Group on Data Sharing. He served as a member of the NIH NCATS Advisory Council Working Group on the IOM CTSA Program. He recently served a second term as a member and the chair of the US Food and Drug Administration Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee.

    Harrington was recently a member of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Board of Trustees and is currently a member of the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Board of Directors, its Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee, and its President-elect. He will serve as the AHA President beginning in July 2019. He served as the Chair for the AHA’s Scientific Sessions in 2013 and 2014. Harrington is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Society for Cardiac Angiography and Intervention, the European Society of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians and the American College of Physicians. He is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and the Association of University Cardiologists. In 2015, he was elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine/Institute of Medicine. In 2016, he was named a Master of the American College of Cardiology. He was awarded the AHA's Clinical Research Prize in 2017.

    Harrington received his BA in English at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA. He attended Dartmouth Medical School and received his MD from Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston MA. He did his internship, residency and served as the chief resident in internal medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester MA. He trained in cardiology, interventional cardiology and clinical research (Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC where he was a faculty member from 1993-2012 before joining the Stanford University faculty in 2012. Interested in innovative learning tools, including novel methods of communicating scientific information, Harrington hosts a regular podcast on theheart.org, The Bob Harrington Show, and can be followed on Twitter @HeartBobH.

  • E. John Harris Jr.

    E. John Harris Jr.

    Professor of Surgery (Vascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in thrombosis and the role of thrombin and its receptor in venous wall remodeling following venous thrombosis. I am also interested in vascular hemodynamics and the use of ultrasound, MRI and computational modeling in evaluating arterial flow in exercise conditions.

  • Odette Harris, MD, MPH

    Odette Harris, MD, MPH

    Professor of Neurosurgery at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Traumatic brain injury with a focus on epidemiology and outcomes.

  • Phillip M. Harter, M.D.

    Phillip M. Harter, M.D.

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical Education, particularly the role of simulation (part-task trainers, human patient simulators and virtual reality) in the education of medical students and residents. Also, the use of the internet for distance learning in health care professions.

  • Gary E Hartman, MD, MBA

    Gary E Hartman, MD, MBA

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Pediatric Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery
    Neonatal Surgery
    Childhood Oncology

  • William Haskell

    William Haskell

    Professor (Research) of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My major research interests and activities over the next several years will focus on the development and evaluation of the objective measurement of physical activity in free-living populations using a variety of sensing devices and mobile phones for data collection and processing. Also, I will continue to direct the Stanford Heart Network with the major mission being to assist community-based CVD prevention/treatment programs implement more effective heart attack and stroke prevention programs.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Flexible statistical modeling for prediction and representation of data arising in biology, medicine, science or industry. Statistical and machine learning tools have gained importance over the years. Part of Hastie's work has been to bridge the gap between traditional statistical methodology and the achievements made in machine learning.

  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Haug supervises a supplemental practicum for doctoral students who are co-leading a Mindfulness group in the Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic. She leads a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows. She also collaborates with Dr. Anna Lembke and Dr. Matthew Kendra on several projects and dissertations related to addiction treatment.

    Dr. Haug is an Affiliate in the Williams PanLab, which investigates precision mental health and translational neuroscience. Dr. Haug supervises postdoctoral fellows and practicum students, and collaborates with Dr. Leanne Williams to develop a training protocol for clinical feedback sessions based on neurocognitive and behavioral assessments. She is particularly interested in the relationship between cannabis and anxiety on neurocognitive functioning.

    Dr. Haug is a core faculty member in the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium where she teaches and advises doctoral students in clinical psychology. Her primary affiliation is with Palo Alto University and she has a small private practice in San Jose, CA.

  • Kristina Elizabeth Hawk

    Kristina Elizabeth Hawk

    Clinical Instructor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Kristina Elizabeth Hawk, MS MD PhD is a Nuclear Medicine Physician and Neuroradiologist. As a physician scientist, integrated MD/PhD training helped build a foundation to explore translational research efforts, using a full and intricate understanding of the research process, and the developed ability to understand, discuss and teach new emerging concepts. Dr. Hawk’s dissertation in Neuroscience focused on the regulation of Nitric Oxide Synthase in the dorsal and ventral striatum, exploring the neurochemical role of nitric oxide producing interneurons, and their ability to coordinate dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling in areas of the brain relevant to cognition and motivated behavior.

    Eager to expand her passion into the field of Medical Radiation Physics, she also completed a separate Masters degree in Medical Radiation Physics. This provided her with in depth training of how therapeutic and diagnostic instruments use both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in the clinical setting. She then completed her Medical Doctorate and Diagnostic Radiology Residency at the University of Southern California (USC), learning the art of medicine while serving the diverse population at Los Angeles County Hospital.

    Dr. Hawk completed clinical fellowship requirements in Nuclear Medicine at USC, and is now Board Certified by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. She also completed a Neuroradiology fellowship at USC, and is Board Certified the American Board of Radiology. She served as both the Chief Resident and Chief Neuroradiology Fellow.

    Dr. Hawk has held multiple local and national leadership positions, including positions in the American College of Radiology (ACR), the American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) and the Society of Nuclear and Molecular Medicine (SNMMI). Dr. Hawk is an editorial board member of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR). She has served as the Vice-Chair for Education for the Nuclear Medicine Resident Organization of the ACNM, and the Educational Liaison for the Resident and Fellow Section of the ACR. Currently, she serves on the national ACR Commission for Women and General Diversity as well as the ACR Commission on Nuclear Medicine. Dr. Hawk also sits on the ACR Council Steering Committee.

    Dr. Hawk is committed to continually exploring the beautiful applications of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation to image and treat the human body.

  • Mary Hawn, MD, FACS

    Mary Hawn, MD, FACS

    Emile Holman Professor in Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My area of research is health services researcher focusing on surgical quality measurement and policy. I have a background and training in epidemiology coupled with my leadership roles in surgical quality measurement. My expertise and extensive experience in evaluation of surgical quality process and outcome linkage has impacted national policy and changed guidelines. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) implementation using national VA data. Defining robust metrics of surgical quality that are actionable and can lead to sustained improvement in our field are of utmost importance. I also have experience with risk prediction modeling for surgical patients. Our Decision Support for Safer Surgery study developed models of real-time risk prediction for major complications and prospectively validated our models in patients and with expert surgeons. We were able to discern where computational risk prediction has added value and where it falls short. We currently have a national study investigating readmissions following major surgical procedures to identify opportunities for improving care and reducing costs.

  • Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio I am a brain tumor neurosurgeon, treating patients with malignant and benign tumors, including glioma, brain metastases, meningioma, vestibular schwannoma, and pituitary adenomas. Our lab seeks greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We currently study the capacity of cellular and cell-free nucleic acids to inform cancer biology and response to therapy. We also use single cell and cell subtype-specific transcriptomics to identify and target infiltrating glioblastoma. We use these techniques to identify mechanisms of tumor migration, and to stop tumor growth. Our laboratory is a unique and collaborative working environment, engaged in a dynamic research environment at Stanford. Our laboratory space lies at the heart of the Stanford campus between the core campus and the medical facilities, emblematic of the translational aspects of our work.

    www.GephartLab.com
    www.GBMseq.org
    https://stan.md/BrainMets

  • Chris Hayward

    Chris Hayward

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hayward's research has focused on risk factors for the onset of adolescent internalizing disorders in adolescent girls and the role of early puberty specifically.

  • Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My scholarly pursuits are primarily focused on the study of death and disease in the pediatric population. It is through this work that I am able to explore fundamental concepts of neoplasia, such as histogenesis and mutagenesis, while utilizing a variety of investigational techniques.

  • Zihuai He

    Zihuai He

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Neurology and of Medicine (BMIR)

    Bio Dr. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2016. Following a postdoctoral training in biostatistics at Columbia University, he joined Stanford University as an assistant professor of neurology and of medicine in 2018. His research is concentrated in the area of statistical genetics and integrative analysis of omics data, with the aim of developing novel statistical and computational methodologies for the identification and interpretation of complex biological pathways involved in human diseases, particularly neurological disorders. His methodology interest includes high-dimensional data analysis, correlated (longitudinal, familial) data analysis and machine learning algorithms.

  • Catherine Heaney

    Catherine Heaney

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Psychology and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Enhancing our understanding of psychosocial factors at work (occupational stress, social support at work, organizational justice, organizational empowerment) that are associated with health and disease.

    Developing effective strategies for enhancing employee resiliency and reducing exposure to psychological and behavioral risk factors at work.

  • Gregory M. Heestand, MD

    Gregory M. Heestand, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Bio Dr. Heestand is a board-certified medical oncologist with a focus on gastrointestinal cancers, primarily hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and gallbladder cancer. He currently serves as the medical oncology champion of the Stanford Hepatobiliary Tumor Board, as well as the principal investigator of multiple clinical trials. He also collaborates with campus laboratories to help develop new biomarker and treatment technologies. Dr. Heestand is a member of the ECOG-ACRIN gastrointestinal committee and serves as a representative to the NCI Hepatobiliary Task Force. He is also the director of the Stanford Medical Oncology Fellowship Program.

    Dr. Heestand and his team take great pride in helping patients and their families face gastrointestinal cancer.

    Outside of the clinic, Dr. Heestand enjoys playing the piano, teaching his kids about music, cooking for friends and family, and surfing the internet for interesting things to read.

  • Shireen Heidari

    Shireen Heidari

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Shireen Heidari, MD is a palliative care and family medicine physician. She works as part of the inpatient palliative care consult team providing complex symptom management and support for patients and families facing any stage of a serious illness. Dr. Heidari is the rotation director for students, residents and fellows on the Stanford inpatient palliative consult service. She is also the clinical lead for the Stanford site of the PERIOP-PC Study, which involves collaboration with the surgical department to evaluate the impact of surgeon-palliative care team co-management for patients and family members preparing for major upper gastrointestinal cancer surgery.

    Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Dr. Heidari attended medical school at Boston University, completed her residency at UC San Diego where she served as chief resident, followed by palliative fellowship at UCLA. Her interests include early palliative care integration, narrative medicine, and expanding primary palliative care skills for all clinicians.

  • Paul Heidenreich, MD

    Paul Heidenreich, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include

    1) The cost-effectiveness of new cardiovascular technologies.
    Example: tests to screen asymptomatic patients for left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    2) Interventions to improve the quality of care of patients with heart disease. Examples: include clinical reminders and home monitoring.

    3) Outcomes research using existing clinical and administrative datasets.

    4) Use of echocardiography to predict prognosis (e.g. diastolic dysfunction).

  • Boris Heifets

    Boris Heifets

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Harnessing synaptic plasticity to treat neuropsychiatric disease

  • Sarah Heilshorn

    Sarah Heilshorn

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Protein engineering
    Tissue engineering
    Regenerative medicine
    Biomaterials

  • Wm. LeRoy Heinrichs

    Wm. LeRoy Heinrichs

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Surgical simulation; team-training in virtual environments; online training of healthcare providers in virtual environments; tele-medicine for acute & chronic disease management in virtual environments

  • Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research seeks to advance our understanding of cerebrovascular disease and to develop new minimally invasive treatments for these diseases. We study ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral aneurysms, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), dural arteriovenous fistulae, and other vascular diseases of the brain. We use state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques to non-invasively study these diseases, and we are developing future endovascular technologies to advance neurointerventional surgery.

    www.heitlab.com

  • H. Craig Heller

    H. Craig Heller

    Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neurobiology of sleep, circadian rhythms, regulation of body temperature, mammalian hibernation, and human exercise physiology. Currently applying background in sleep and circadian neurobiology the understanding and correcting the learning disability of Down Syndrome.

  • Stefan Heller

    Stefan Heller

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the inner ear, from its earliest manifestation as one of the cranial placodes until it has developed into a mature and functioning organ. We are interested how the sensory epithelia of the inner ear that harbor the sensory hair cells develop, how the cells mature, and how these epithelia respond to toxic insults. The overarching goal of this research is to find was to regenerate lost sensory hair cells in mammals.

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