School of Medicine


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  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Principal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The neurobiology of autism
    Neuroimaging in individuals with autism
    Psychopharmacological treatment of children and adults with autism and/or developmental disorders
    The neurobiology and innovative interventions of several neurogenic disorders including DiGeorge Syndrome (Velocardiofacial syndrome; 22q11.2 mutations), PTEN mutations, and Phelan McDermid Syndrome (22q13 mutations).

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Child Psychiatry

    Bio The overarching goal of my research is to identify neurobiological subgroups and develop objective treatment prediction markers for children with neurodevelopmental disorders in order to improve biologically-based diagnosis and advance individualized treatment. Biologically-based diagnosis and treatment is extremely limited for neurodevelopment disorders but also critically-needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes, especially for pervasive disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in which early intervention is often the most efficacious. My early career training has focused on developing expertise to study the neurobiology and treatment of ASD and my research has primarily focused on the application of non-invasive neuroimaging approaches to examine brain-behavior relationships and treatment outcomes.

    Thus far, my primary contributions to science fall within four primary categories: 1) identifying the neural correlates of cognitive/behavioral deficits, 2) investigating the neurobiological substrates of treatment response, 3) examining the etiological factors that contribute to alterations in brain development, and 4) contributing to ASD-related resources. My early research investigated the mechanisms associated with the cognitive deficits of alexithymia and dyslexia to further develop theories of the underlying neurobiology. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on ASD, examined the neural correlates of treatment response to beta-blockers in adults with ASD and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to symptom presentation. Currently, I am further developing my expertise for assessing young children with ASD in my current postdoctoral position at Stanford. My most recent research has primarily focused on examining the neural correlates of treatment response as well as the etiological factors that contribute to brain development in twins with ASD.