School of Medicine


Showing 1-16 of 16 Results

  • Susan Galel

    Susan Galel

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transfusion-transmitted infections and donor screening for infectious diseases. National policies for blood banks. Enhancement of transfusion safety and effectiveness, with a focus on quality assurance in blood banking and transfusion therapy; transfusion medicine education; pediatric and adult transfusion therapy.

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease. We study both the roles of mast cells, basophils, and IgE in normal physiology and host defense, e.g., in responses to parasites and in enhancing resistance to venoms, and also their roles in pathology, e.g., anaphylaxis, food allergy, and asthma, both in mice and humans.

  • Sharon Markham Geaghan

    Sharon Markham Geaghan

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Hematopathology, Pediatric Laboratory Medicine and Pathology

  • Elias Roth Gerrick

    Elias Roth Gerrick

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Eli received his B.S. in Microbiology and Immunology from U.C. Irvine in 2013, where he worked in the lab of Dr. Celia Goulding. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2018 in the lab of Dr. Sarah Fortune, where he studied post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Eli joined the Howitt lab at Stanford in the summer of 2018, where he is studying the influence of protozoan members of the microbiome on intestinal immunity.

  • Alin Lucian Girnita

    Alin Lucian Girnita

    Clinical Professor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Alin Girnita received his MD/PhD degrees from the University of Medicine in Craiova, Romania, where he was board certified in cardiovascular surgery. He completed his fellowship in transplantation immunology, histocompatibility and immunogenetics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical center, where he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Pathology and Associate Director of HLA lab. Between 2009-2019, Dr. Girnita was an Associate Professor, and then Professor of Surgery and Director of Transplant Immunology Division at University of Cincinnati. Since November 2019, he was recruited as a Professor of Pathology at Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Girnita has authored over 40 scientific articles that have been cited over 1500 times. His research interest involves the alloimmune response in solid-organ transplantation, markers of antibody-mediated rejection, influence of various therapeutic protocols on desensitization and alloimmune response, structural matching and genetic polymorphism in transplantation.

  • Alex Gitlin

    Alex Gitlin

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Alex Gitlin, M.D., Ph.D. is currently a 3rd year resident in clinical pathology at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, Alex received his M.D. from Weill Cornell Medicine (2017) and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University (2016) as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program. During his graduate training, Dr. Gitlin focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying germinal center reactions and the formation of long-lived humoral immunity. His work elucidated the mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells induce selective clonal expansion of germinal center B cells during the immune response. Currently, Alex's clinical and research interests lie in understanding how inflammatory signaling pathways regulate different forms of programmed cell death and inflammation.

  • Matthew Gologorsky

    Matthew Gologorsky

    Research Assistant, Pathology Sponsored Projects

    Bio Matthew received his B.S. in Neuroscience from the University of Michigan in 2018. There, he worked in the lab of Dr. Paul Jenkins exploring the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disease. Matthew joined the Howitt lab at Stanford in the fall of 2018, where he is studying tuft cells and the enteric nervous system.

  • Isabella Graef

    Isabella Graef

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in addressing questions in neuronal development and function by a combination of genetic, cell biological, biochemical and chemical approaches.
    The main focus of our lab is centered around two topics: 1) the interface of signaling and gene regulation in neuronal development, with a focus on calcineurin-NFAT signaling; 2) the development of small molecules, which interfere with protein-protein interactions underlying neurodegenerative diseases.

  • Dita Gratzinger

    Dita Gratzinger

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have research interests in the interaction of hematolymphoid neoplasia with the microenvironment. For example, I use a combination of immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and image analysis techniques to evaluate the mesenchymal stromal cell compartment in myelodysplastic syndrome (pre-leukemic bone marrow failure disorder). I also have interests in lymphoma vasculature and the tropism of lymphoma for specific types of vasculature.

  • Shirley Greenbaum Karin

    Shirley Greenbaum Karin

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio After 3 years in OBGYN residency program in Israel I decided to pursue a dream and joined the Angelo lab to conduct placental research. I am particularly interested in decidual immune cell populations in normal placentation and in obstetric complications, such as preeclampsia and preterm birth.

Latest information on COVID-19