School of Medicine


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  • Aaron D. Gitler

    Aaron D. Gitler

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and ALS. We don't limit ourselves to one model system or experimental approach. We start with yeast, perform genetic and chemical screens, and then move to other model systems (e.g. mammalian tissue culture, mouse, fly) and even work with human patient samples (tissue sections, patient-derived cells, including iPS cells) and next generation sequencing approaches.

  • Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Since 1992 my work has concentrated on ethical, legal, and social issues in the biosciences. I am particularly active on issues arising from neuroscience, human genetics, and stem cell research, with cross-cutting interests in human research protections, human biological enhancement, and the future of human reproduction.

  • William Greenleaf

    William Greenleaf

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab focuses on developing methods to probe both the structure and function of molecules encoded by the genome, as well as the physical compaction and folding of the genome itself. Our efforts are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies and cutting-edge optical microscopies, and bringing these technologies to bear against basic biological questions by linking DNA sequence, structure, and function.

  • Tuhin Guha

    Tuhin Guha

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Genetics

    Bio I am a dynamic research individual with more than eight years of extensive research experience in molecular biology techniques ranging from DNA/RNA manipulations, recombinant protein expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of DNA-cutting enzymes, needed for genetic engineering. My current postdoctoral studies in the Department of Genetics, Stanford University involve development of novel gene therapy approaches to cure muscle disorders, particularly Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A using mouse models. My previous postdoctoral experience in the Department of Biochemistry, University of Western Ontario, includes generating stable/transient mammalian cell lines, DNA transfection, electroporation, gene repair studies using modified CRISPR system through plasmid/protein-oligo based transfections, electroporation in human cells, microinjection in frog embryos and analyzing editing efficiencies using flow cytometry. I have a multi-disciplinary background, therefore I have a solid understanding and working knowledge in a broader domain within the biological sciences, be it from animal behavior, ecology, gene regulation, genetic diseases to understanding and designing “molecular switches” within DNA-cutting proteins, such as meganucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 for genome engineering. I have strong communication skills, presented my research in various conferences and published heavily in the field of DNA-cutting enzymes and their use as genome editing tools. I have a proven ability to manage challenging research objectives, collaborated with other research teams, and delivered results effectively. I always welcome new ideas and interact with people to learn any new skills and experiences. I have also supervised several undergraduate project students, summer students and junior graduate students. My mentorship to the lab colleagues have been very productive. While I am not working, I enjoy photography.