School of Medicine


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  • Robert Michael Fairchild

    Robert Michael Fairchild

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fairchild’s research interests center on novel applications of ultrasonography in rheumatologic disease. Current active research endeavors include using ultrasound 1) to evaluate articular and soft tissue manifestations of systemic sclerosis, 2) to screen, detect and monitor of connective tissue disease associated interstitial lung disease, 3) and to examine the incidence of immune checkpoint inhibitor related adverse events and inflammatory arthritis.

  • Alice C. Fan

    Alice C. Fan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fan is a physician scientist who studies how turning off oncogenes (cancer genes) can cause tumor regression in preclinical and clinical translational studies. Based on her findings, she has initiated clinical trials studying how targeted therapies affect cancer signals in kidney cancer and low grade lymphoma. In the laboratory, she uses new nanotechnology strategies for tumor diagnosis and treatment to define biomarkers for personalized therapy.

  • Weiguo Fan

    Weiguo Fan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Gastroenterology

    Bio My research focuses on liver diseases. I got my Ph.D. degree in virology and immune response at Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The two main projects during my Ph.D. program are: 1) explore the relationship between the immune response in Hepatitis C virus infection and Interferon treatment; and 2) investigate the function of ECM1 in liver fibrosis. As a postdoc in Stanford, I will try to integrate basic and translational liver research and focus on: 1) investigate molecular functions of liver immune cells in liver disease; 2) explore key factors determining the change of liver microenvironment that cause liver diseases; 3) use new techniques, such as next-generation sequencing, RNAseq or signal cell sequencing, to explore key factors affecting liver disease and treatment in patients.

  • Diana Farid

    Diana Farid

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Vaden Health Center

    Bio Diana Farid MD, MPH is a physician, filmmaker and writer. She is a staff physician at the Stanford Vaden Health Center and clinical assistant professor in the Stanford Department of Medicine. She holds a BA in Peace and Conflict Studies from Berkeley. She was awarded a fellowship by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to serve as a Child and Family Health Leadership Fellow at UCLA while earning a Masters in Public Health focusing on community health sciences, health communications and storytelling as a means for health behavior change. She has provided public health education and health care in rural villages in Honduras, advocated for peace in the Ukraine and Malaysia, worked as an education coordinator at the School of the Nations in Macau, China, worked at the US Agency for International Development, Center for Human Rights and Democracy for Latin America and the Caribbean, and has advocated for equity, human rights and violence prevention at both Physicians for Social Responsibility and Physicians for Human Rights. She has cared for patients in a wide range of clinic settings including at the Los Angeles Free Clinic, Kaiser, private and university affiliated practices. At UCLA, she served as Doctoring course faculty to first year UCLA medical students.

    She is dedicated to creating and amplifying those stories that move humanity towards health. As a physician consultant for The Media Project, Advocates for Youth, Diana worked with television and film writers and producers to promote adolescent health through entertainment, providing on and off camera expertise on adolescent health issues including for TV shows such as GREY’S ANATOMY and STRONG MEDICINE. Her debut feature length documentary film production, AMERICAN RHYTHMS (2009) (americanrhythmsmovie.com/), explores the positive impact of music on a group of 5th grade students at a Los Angeles urban elementary school. As the Assistant Director of Stanford School of Medicine’s Program in Bioethics and Film, she produced film screenings and post-screening discussions with producers/directors/field experts exploring films with vital bioethical and public health education impact. She also established the Film and Medicine Interest group for medical students to study film as a health promotion tool and mentored medical student film projects. She was a lead producer of the 2018 Stanford Frankenstein@200 year-long film screening series and panels exploring the cultural, social and bioethical impact of medical research, technology and healthcare through the lens of story in film. She writes poetry, essays and picture books. Her debut picture book, WHEN YOU BREATHE (Cameron + Kids), will be published in the fall of 2020.

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control regulatory T cell (Treg) responsiveness by inhibiting the Treg IL-2 receptor desensitization. We have characterized a gene (Deaf1) that plays a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D. Using PBC gene expression, we have provisionally identified a signature of risk and progression in T1D.

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