School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 17 Results

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We use lentiviral mediated transduction of murine dendritic cells with immunoregulatory proteins for site specific and targeted immunotherapy. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control T cell anergy. We have recently characterized a gene (Deaf1) that seems to play a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D.

  • BrianĀ Feldman

    BrianĀ Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overall goal of our research is to understand on both a molecular and systemic level how hormones regulate stem cell fate decisions and the role these pathways play in both physiology and disease. We use molecular biology and in vivo models to elucidate mechanisms of regulating cell fate determination by the endocrine system. Understanding these processes has profound and broad implications for both science and health.

  • David Feldman

    David Feldman

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies of the role of the vitamin D receptor in the action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the active vitamin D hormone. Current efforts are evaluating the vitamin D receptor in breast and prostate cancer, osteoporosis and rickets.

  • Marcus Feldman

    Marcus Feldman

    Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Human genetic and cultural evolution, mathematical biology, demography of China

  • Dean W. Felsher

    Dean W. Felsher

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory investigates how oncogenes initiate and sustain tumorigenesis. I have developed model systems whereby I can conditionally activate oncogenes in normal human and mouse cells in tissue culture or in specific tissues of transgenic mice. In particular using the tetracycline regulatory system, I have generated a conditional model system for MYC-induced tumors. I have shown that cancers caused by the conditional over-expression of the MYC proto-oncogene regress with its inactivation.

  • Russell D. Fernald

    Russell D. Fernald

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In the course of evolution,two of the strongest selective forces in nature,light and sex, have left their mark on living organisms. I am interested in how the development and function of the nervous system reflects these events. We use the reproductive system to understand how social behavior influences the main system of reproductive action controlled by a collection of cells in the brain containing gonodotropin releasing hormone(GnRH)

  • James Ferrell

    James Ferrell

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab has two main goals: to understand mitotic regulation and to understand the systems-level logic of simple signaling circuits. We often make use of Xenopus laevis oocytes, eggs, and cell-free extracts for both sorts of study. We also carry out single-cell fluorescence imaging studies on mammalian cell lines. Our experimental work is complemented by computational and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the design principles of regulatory circuits.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor in Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • George A. Fisher Jr.

    George A. Fisher Jr.

    Colleen Haas Chair in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical expertise in GI cancers with research which emphasizes Phase I and II clinical trials of novel therapies but also includes translational studies including biomarkers, molecular imaging, tumor immunology and development of immunotherapeutic trials.

Stanford Medicine Resources: