School of Medicine


Showing 1-17 of 17 Results

  • David Eagleman

    David Eagleman

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio David Eagleman is a neuroscientist, bestselling author, and Guggenheim Fellow. Dr. Eagleman’s areas of research include sensory substitution, time perception, vision, and synesthesia. He also studies the intersection of neuroscience with the legal system, and in that capacity he directs the non-profit Center for Science and Law. Eagleman is the writer and presenter of The Brain, an Emmy-nominated television series on PBS and BBC. He is the author of many books, including The Runaway Species, The Brain, Incognito, and Wednesday is Indigo Blue. He is also the author of a widely adopted textbook on cognitive neuroscience, Brain and Behavior. He has also written a bestselling book of literary fiction, Sum, which has been translated into 32 languages, turned into two operas, and named a Best Book of the Year by Barnes and Noble. Dr. Eagleman has been a TED speaker, a guest on the Colbert Report, and profiled in the New Yorker magazine. He has launched several neuroscience companies from his research, including BrainCheck and NeoSensory.

  • Matthew Louis Edwards

    Matthew Louis Edwards

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Matthew Edwards is a resident physician in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His clinical interests are in community psychiatry and his research interests lie at the intersection of medical history, ethics and public policy.

    Matthew graduated from Princeton University in 2010 with a degree in Sociology and received a graduate certificate in public health from the University of Texas School of Public Health in 2012. He received his MD with honors in research from the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine in 2017. He was a Pearce Fellow in the History of Medicine at the Clendening Library of the University of Kansas Medical Center in 2015.

  • Katherine Eisen

    Katherine Eisen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eisen is a Clinical Assistant Professor and CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Her research and clinical interest center on therapeutic interventions that support recovery for individuals living with serious mental illness, in particular for individuals with psychosis. Dr. Eisen received her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, and her PhD from the University of Connecticut, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. Before coming to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Eisen worked for over 10 years as a psychologist on the acute inpatient units at Stanford Health Care. Dr. Eisen is trained in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) and has worked with colleagues to train therapists, nursing and multidisciplinary staff, medical students, and residents to integrate CBTp informed, recovery-oriented approaches into their work with individuals with psychosis. She provides both individual and group-based cognitive behavioral therapy.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a psychiatrist and instructor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won a multi-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Flint Espil

    Flint Espil

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Flint Espil researches the etiology and treatment of tic disorders (including Tourette’s), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and body-focused repetitive behaviors. He is interested in how psychosocial factors, the environment, and underlying brain circuitry influence treatment outcomes among individuals seeking treatment. Dr. Espil is currently collaborating with the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and the Brain Stimulation Lab to explore novel imaging techniques (e.g., functional near-infrared spectroscopy) and neuromodulation approaches (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation) to improve our understanding of these disorders. He is also exploring ways to adapt and implement evidence-based mental health approaches in community settings. He is currently collaborating with community-based organizations in East Palo Alto to improve access to care for youth in school settings.

  • Amit Etkin, MD, PhD

    Amit Etkin, MD, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overarching aim of the Etkin lab is to understand the neural basis of emotional disorders and their treatment, and to leverage this knowledge to develop novel treatment interventions. Our work is organized around the study of the neuroscience of emotion and cognitive regulation, as well as neural circuit function, in healthy subjects and individuals with a range of psychiatric disorders.

  • Stephanie Allen Evans

    Stephanie Allen Evans

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Resume visible at http://bit.ly/EvansResume
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