School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 126 Results

  • Kyle Eagen

    Kyle Eagen

    MD Student, expected graduation Spring 2018

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Chromatin structure, chromosome folding, nuclear architecture, gene regulation

  • David Eagleman

    David Eagleman

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio David Eagleman is a neuroscientist, bestselling author, and Guggenheim Fellow. Dr. Eagleman’s areas of research include sensory substitution, time perception, vision, and synesthesia. He also studies the intersection of neuroscience with the legal system, and in that capacity he directs the non-profit Center for Science and Law. Eagleman is the writer and presenter of The Brain, an Emmy-nominated television series on PBS and BBC. He is the author of many books, including The Runaway Species, The Brain, Incognito, and Wednesday is Indigo Blue. He is also the author of a widely adopted textbook on cognitive neuroscience, Brain and Behavior. He has also written a bestselling book of literary fiction, Sum, which has been translated into 32 languages, turned into two operas, and named a Best Book of the Year by Barnes and Noble. Dr. Eagleman has been a TED speaker, a guest on the Colbert Report, and profiled in the New Yorker magazine. He has launched several neuroscience companies from his research, including BrainCheck and NeoSensory.

  • Sarah Eagleman

    Sarah Eagleman

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio For over a decade my research career as a systems neuroscientist has been centered around measuring the brain in different states of consciousness using electrophysiology. Two ways to study conscious transitions empirically are by investigating the brain during sleep and while under anesthesia. I spent my doctoral and early postdoctoral work studying how sleep improves learning and memory at the neural network level. I characterized a phenomenon known as replay (when networks in the brain rehearse previous experiences offline) in a novel visual area. I continued research on replay in my early postdoctoral work in the hippocampus (an area important for spatial navigation as well as memory formation). My work centered around trying to understand how different hippocampal replay trajectories are selected by reward centers in the brain for future behavioral action. 

    I am now interested in studying the brain activity associated with anesthetics to broaden my understanding of brain states that exhibit altered consciousness. In fact, the brain shares similar electrophysiological activity during sleep with some anesthetic transitions. With anesthetics, though one is able to compare how different anesthetic agents interact with different neuromodulatory systems to cause similar behavior outcomes (i.e. sedation and unconsciousness). My current project is to explore and evaluate different computational approaches to quantifying anesthetic depth using electroencephalography. A thorough characterization of the brain activity associated with loss of consciousness during anesthesia is of critical importance to better monitor patients undergoing anesthesia. I am excited by this new opportunity to meld my previous expertise in systems neuroscience electrophysiology with clinical and translational work. It has been a long-term aspiration of mine to do research that will have direct applications to improving human health. 

  • John Eaton

    John Eaton

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor in the School of Engineering

    Bio Eaton uses experiments and computational simulations to study the flow and heat transfer in complex turbulent flows, especially those relevant to turbomachinery, particle-laden flows, and separated flows, and to develop new techniques for precise control of gas and surface temperature during manufacturing processes.