School of Medicine


Showing 361-370 of 431 Results

  • David Drover

    David Drover

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Field of clinical pharmacology. This involves analysis of what the body does to a drug (pharmacokinetics) and how exactly a specific drug affects the body (pharmacodynamics). His research starts at the level of new drug development with detailed analysis of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a medication.

  • Shaul Druckmann

    Shaul Druckmann

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research goal is to understand how dynamics in neuronal circuits relate and constrain the representation of information and computations upon it. We adopt three synergistic strategies: First, we analyze neural circuit population recordings to better understand the relation between neural dynamics and behavior, Second, we theoretically explore the types of dynamics that could be associated with particular network computations. Third, we analyze the structural properties of neural circuits.

  • Maurice L. Druzin

    Maurice L. Druzin

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Antepartum and intrapartum fetal monitoring Prenatal diagnosis Medical complications of pregnancy, particularly: SLE, hypertension, diabetes, malignancy A.

  • Justin Du Bois

    Justin Du Bois

    Henry Dreyfus Professor in Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Research and Scholarship

    Research in the Du Bois laboratory spans reaction methods development, natural product synthesis, and chemical biology, and draws on expertise in molecular design, molecular recognition, and physical organic chemistry. An outstanding goal of our program has been to develop C–H bond functionalization processes as general methods for organic chemistry, and to demonstrate how such tools can impact the logic of chemical synthesis. A second area of interest focuses on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of channel subtypes in the sensation of pain. This work is enabled in part through the advent of small molecule modulators of channel function.

    The Du Bois group has described new tactics for the selective conversion of saturated C–H to C–N and C–O bonds. These methods have general utility in synthesis, making possible the single-step incorporation of nitrogen and oxygen functional groups and thus simplifying the process of assembling complex molecules. To date, lab members have employed these versatile oxidation technologies to prepare natural products that include manzacidin A and C, agelastatin, tetrodotoxin, and saxitoxin. Detailed mechanistic studies of metal-catalyzed C–H functionalization reactions are performed in parallel with process development and chemical synthesis. These efforts ultimately give way to advances in catalyst design. A long-standing goal of this program is to identify robust catalyst systems that afford absolute control of reaction selectivity.

    In a second program area, the Du Bois group is exploring voltage-gated ion channel structure and function using the tools of chemistry in combination with those of molecular biology, electrophysiology, microscopy and mass spectrometry. Much of this work has focused on studies of eukaryotic Na and Cl ion channels. The Du Bois lab is interested in understanding the biochemical mechanisms that underlie channel subtype regulation and how such processes may be altered following nerve injury. Small molecule toxins serve as lead compounds for the design of isoform-selective channel modulators, affinity reagents, and fluorescence imaging probes. Access to toxins and modified forms thereof (including saxitoxin, gonyautoxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) through de novo synthesis drives studies to elucidate toxin-receptor interactions and to develop new pharmacologic tools to study ion channel function in primary cells and murine pain models.

  • Monica M. Dua, MD

    Monica M. Dua, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Technical aspects of minimally invasive pancreatic and liver surgery
    Minimally invasive strategies for the management of pancreatic necrosis
    Management of severe acute pancreatitis – academic vs community treatment
    Multidisciplinary treatment of HCC; institutional barriers to appropriate referral/ care
    Endocrine/exocrine insufficiency after pancreatectomy; volumetric assessment
    Natural history and management of pancreatic cysts

  • Seraina A Dual

    Seraina A Dual

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiological Sciences Laboratory

    Bio Seraina A. Dual is a postodoctoral fellow at the departments of Radiology at Stanford Medicine and Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, mentored by Prof. Doff McElHinney, Prof. Daniel Ennis, and Prof. Alison Marsden. She graduated with a Bachelor's degree from the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) in Mechanical Engineering, a master's degree at ETH Zurich in Mechanical Engineering with a specialization in robotics and biomedical application with Prof. Roger Gassert, and her Dr. of science at ETH Zurich in Mechanical Engineering with Prof. Mirko Meboldt. During this time, she spent some time with Prof. Ellen Kuhl at Stanford University (BSc), with Prof. Theo Chee Leong at National University of Singapore (MSc), and with Prof. Christopher Hayward at the St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney (DSc). Her work focuses on developing dynamic systems, algorithms, and sensors inspired by her background in engineering and control methodology to either improve our pathophysiological understanding of disease or enable physiological interaction of patients with intelligent medical devices.

  • Dawn Duane

    Dawn Duane

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a general pediatric neurologist. My interest is in clinical diagnosis and treatment of common neurologic diseases in pediatric patients and teaching feature doctors, neurologists and pediatric neurologists about pediatric neurology.

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