School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 26 Results

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center)

    Bio Dr. Demirci is currently a Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine with tenure at the Canary Center for Early Cancer Detection. Prior to his Stanford appointment, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology serving at the Division of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Infectious Diseases and Renal Division. He leads a group of 20+ researchers focusing on micro- and nano-scale technologies. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University.

    The Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine Lab (BAMM) specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. Our goal is to apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, we create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic.

    Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. Dr. Demirci has published over 120 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. He is fellow-elect of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (AIMBE, 2017). His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012), Scientist of the year award from Stanford radiology Department (2017). He was selected as one of the world’s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review at the age of 28. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur’s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow, KOEK Biotechnology and LEVITAS. There has been over 10,000 live births in the US, Europe and Turkey using the sperm selection technology that came out of Dr. Demirci's lab. He has been cited over 3000 times within the last two years (H index, 60).

  • Terry Desser

    Terry Desser

    Professor of Radiology (Abdominal Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of gastrointestinal tract cancer
    Ultrasound
    Simulated learning environment

  • Tommaso Di Ianni

    Tommaso Di Ianni

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiology

    Bio I am a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford School of Medicine in the Department of Radiology. My primary research focus is in the development of cutting-edge technological innovations for imaging and noninvasive targeted drug delivery based on ultrasound. I strive to implement tools with high potential for clinical translation and aim at producing a substantial impact on the clinical practice.

    At the moment, I am working on the systematic and noninvasive manipulation of the nervous system by using focused ultrasound combined with ultrasound-activated drug carriers. In addition, I am implementing functional imaging of brain-wide neuronal activity based on power Doppler ultrasound as a readout of the neuromodulation.

  • Jennifer Dionne

    Jennifer Dionne

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio Jennifer Dionne is an associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford. Jen received her Ph. D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, advised by Harry Atwater, and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry at Berkeley, advised by Paul Alivisatos. Jen’s research develops new optical materials and microscopies to observe chemical and biological processes as they unfold with nanometer scale resolution. She then uses these observations to help improve energy-relevant processes (such as photocatalysis and energy storage) and medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Her work has been recognized with the Alan T. Waterman Award (2019), a Moore Inventor Fellowship (2017), the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2017), Adolph Lomb Medal (2016), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (2015), and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2014), and was recently featured on Oprah’s list of “50 Things that will make you say ‘Wow’!”.

  • Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Dodd is involved in clinical trials using endovascular coils that have a fiber coating that help heal aneurysms of the neck and can prevent an aneurysm from reforming. He uses minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to treat brain tumors.

    Dodd's research interests are in cerebral blood vessel reactivity and stroke.