School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 165 Results

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Bio Gary L. Darmstadt, MD, MS, is Associate Dean for Maternal and Child Health, and Professor of Neonatal and Developmental Pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Previously Dr. Darmstadt was Senior Fellow in the Global Development Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where he led a cross-foundation initiative on Women, Girls and Gender, assessing how addressing gender inequalities and empowering women and girls leads to improved gender equality as well as improved health and development outcomes. Prior to this role, he served as BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across nutrition, family planning and maternal, newborn and child health.

    Darmstadt was formerly Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has trained in Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University, in Dermatology at Stanford University, and in Pediatric Infectious Disease as a fellow at the University of Washington, Seattle, where he was Assistant Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine. Dr. Darmstadt left the University of Washington to serve as Senior Research Advisor for the Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where he led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival, before joining Johns Hopkins.

  • Beth Darnall

    Beth Darnall

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry & Psychology (Adult)) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests A principal investigator for multiple federal awards that focus broadly on developing and investigating evidence based treatments to: (1) expand and scale access to behavioral medicine for acute and chronic pain via digital and brief treatments; (2) reduce need for opioids and associated risks; (3) reduce pain and its negative impacts via behavioral medicine; (4) train physicians and care providers on behavioral pain medicine principles and therapeutic engagement to enhance patient outcomes.

  • Millie Das

    Millie Das

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Bio Dr. Das specializes in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. She sees and treats patients both at the Stanford Cancer Center and at the Palo Alto VA Hospital. She is Chief of Oncology at the Palo Alto VA and also leads the VA thoracic tumor board on a biweekly basis. She has a strong interest in clinical research, serving as a principal investigator for multiple clinical and translational studies at the Palo Alto VA, and also as a co-investigator on all of the lung cancer trials at Stanford. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and running.

  • Rhiju Das

    Rhiju Das

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab seeks an agile and predictive understanding of how nucleic acids and proteins code for information processing in living systems. We develop new computational & chemical tools to enable the precise modeling, regulation, and design of RNA and RNA/protein machines.

  • Rajesh Dash, MD PhD;      Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Rajesh Dash, MD PhD; Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two research areas:
    1) Heart disease in South Asians - genetic, metabolic, & behavioral underpinnings of an aggressive phenotype.

    2) Imaging cell injury & recovery in the heart. Using Cardiac MRI to visualize signals of early injury and facilitating preventive medical therapy. Optimizing new imaging methods for viable cells to delineate live heart cells or transplanted stem cells.

  • Tami Daugherty

    Tami Daugherty

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Daugherty is a transplant Hepatologist with full-time clinical responsibilities. She is particularly interested in the natural course and management of recurrent Hepatitis C after liver transplant, and the effect of immunosuppression on HCV recurrence.

  • Guido Davidzon

    Guido Davidzon

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Dr. Guido A. Davidzon is a physician-scientist board certified in Nuclear Medicine. He is an attending physician in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care.

    He graduated with honors from medical school in Argentina and completed an internship at Yale University New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He did his residency and was chief resident at Stanford Health Care. He completed a research fellowship in mitochondrial diseases at Columbia University in New York and, a U.S. National Library of Medicine Award supported, Biomedical Informatics fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in conjunction with a Science Masters at MIT.

    Dr. Davidzon is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His clinical specialties include early diagnostic imaging of cancer, coronary artery disease, and dementias using molecular probes as well as the treatment of cancer for which he employs targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy.

    Dr. Davidzon investigates the use of machine learning in medical imaging to improve clinical outcomes, he is involved in the professional Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He serves as a peer reviewer for multiple medical journals. Dr. Davidzon is a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina and has lived in the U.S. for over a decade. He travels to Argentina frequently, with his wife and three sons.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Professor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water and sanitation services play in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Kara Davis

    Kara Davis

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Childhood cancers can be considered aberrations of normal tissue development. We are interested in understanding childhood cancers through the lens of normal development. Further, individual tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, not all cells being equal in their ability to respond to treatment or to repopulate a tumor. Thus, we take single cell approach to determine populations of clinical relevance.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    Director, Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection and the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Korina De Bruyne

    Korina De Bruyne

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The treatment of chronic pain with long term opioid medication is what has fueled the so called “opioid epidemic” with drug overdose deaths quadrupling in the past decade and addiction rates estimated to be more than 20 percent of patients taking medical opioids long term. Associated complications with these medications are not generally known to the patients. The project enables the patient to examine risks versus benefits, presents safer and more effective alternatives to opioid therapy and educates about options available for reducing or transitioning off opioids.

  • Sallie De Golia

    Sallie De Golia

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. De Golia specializes in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders with an expertise in time-limited dynamic psychotherapy. She is Section Chief of the Assessment Clinics and Director of the Evaluation Clinic. Dr. De Golia is the Associate Chair for Clinician Educator Professional Development where she is involved in developing faculty development programs including mentorship. She is also the Associate Residency Director of the Adult Psychiatry Residency Program where she has been involved in educational programming and curricular development. She is a Peer Teaching Coach in the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy, teaches regularly with the Stanford Center for Faculty Development, and is a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Center for Innovation in Global Health. She currently serves on the Executive Committee of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training.