School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 56 Results

  • Michele Calos

    Michele Calos

    Professor of Genetics, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab is developing innovative gene and stem cell therapies for genetic diseases, with a focus on gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    We have created novel methods for inserting therapeutic genes into the chromosomes at specific places by using homologous recombination and recombinase enzymes.

    We are working on 3 forms of muscular dystrophy.

    We created induced pluripotent stem cells from patient fibroblasts, added therapeutic genes, differentiated, and engrafted the cells.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Bio David B. Camarillo is Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Jan Carette

    Jan Carette

    Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the identification of host genes that play critical roles in the pathogenesis of infectious agents including viruses. We use haploid genetic screens in human cells as an efficient approach to perform loss-of-function studies. Besides obtaining fundamental insights on how viruses hijack cellular processes and on host defense mechanisms, it may also facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  • Jennifer Carlson

    Jennifer Carlson

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Female athlete triad; adolescents and eating disorders; athletes and supplement use; effects of sports involvement on adolescent self-esteem.

  • Suzan Carmichael

    Suzan Carmichael

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology), of Obstetrics & Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Carmichael is a perinatal and nutritional epidemiologist and Professor of Pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on finding ways to improve maternal and infant health. Exposure themes include nutrition, social context, care, environmental contaminants and genetics. Outcome themes include severe maternal morbidity, stillbirth, birth defects, and preterm delivery. She is particularly interested in understanding the intersectionality of these varied types of exposures and outcomes and how they interact to impact health and health disparities, for the mother-baby dyad.

  • Victor Carrion

    Victor Carrion

    John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Examines the interplay between brain development and stress vulnerability via a multi-method approach that includes psychophysiology, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology and phenomenology. Treatment development that focuses on individual and community-based interventions for stress related conditions in children and adolescents that experience traumatic stress.

  • Thomas Caruso

    Thomas Caruso

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research pursuits are focused on system based improvement projects. At Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, I use system based approaches to improve the quality of care patients receive in the perioperative area and in the ICUs, with a focus on safe transitions of care. Through the Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford School of Medicine, I advise residency and fellowship programs on evidence based methods to improve their programs, with a focus on mentorship.

  • Brendan Carvalho

    Brendan Carvalho

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research interest is in clinical and translational research related to cesarean delivery and labor analgesia as well as maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics drug modeling.

  • Alma-Martina Cepika

    Alma-Martina Cepika

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio Dr. Cepika is an immunologist with an extensive background in translational research, autoimmunity, autoinflammation, and human systems immunology. Her goal is to understand the mechanisms governing immunological tolerance, and to leverage this knowledge to cure currently incurable diseases.

    Dr. Cepika received her MD degree and a PhD in Immunology from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine in Croatia. There, she focused on the immunomonitoring of patients with lupus, identifying how circulating DNA levels changed with therapy. Subsequently, she joined the lab of Dr. Virginia Pascual at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Pascual had previously discovered that IL-1beta is a key pathogenic player in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), but the immune alterations contributing to IL-1beta-mediated inflammation remained unknown. To address this, Dr. Cepika developed a 3D in vitro stimulation assay to evaluate immune responses of blood leukocytes of pediatric sJIA patients. In combination with integrated bioinformatics analysis, this approach identified aberrant cellular responses, transcriptional pathways and genes that shed new light on immune dysregulation in sJIA. This assay can be further applied to dissect underlying immunopathogenic mechanisms in many human disorders.

    Currently, Dr. Cepika is a member of the laboratory of Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo, in the Pediatric Division of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. There, she is working to uncover the underlying mechanisms governing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cell differentiation and function, and use this knowledge to design Tr1 cell-based therapies for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and cancer immunotherapy.

  • Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two main research interests:
    1) to better understand and treat patients with aggressive basal and squamous cell carcinomas
    2) to better understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of healthy human skin aging and to translate these insights into better care of skin diseases enriched in older patients particularly skin cancer and rosacea

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Genomics and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Stephanie Chao

    Stephanie Chao

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chao's research focuses on preventing surgical diseases minimizing the impact of surgery. She works with the Asian Liver Center towards the global eradication of hepatitis B, the leading cause of liver cancer and liver disease globally. Dr. Chao helped launch the Jade Ribbon Campaign in 2001 to improve public and physician awareness about hepatitis B. Dr. Chao also serves as the Trauma Medical Director of LPCH and is interested in preventing pediatric traumatic injuries.

  • Danton Char

    Danton Char

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Char's research is focused on identifying and addressing ethical concerns associated with the implementation of next generation technologies like whole genome sequencing and its attendant technologies like machine learning to bedside clinical care.

  • Bertha Chen, MD

    Bertha Chen, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology - Urogynecology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chen’s research examines the molecular causes of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. Recognizing that urinary incontinence linked to demise of smooth muscle sphincter function, she is investigating the potential use of stem cell regeneration to restore muscle capacity.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Alan G. Cheng

    Alan G. Cheng

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Active Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Directs an infectious disease laboratory that performs basic, translational, and clinical research. Laboratory has particular focus on:
    1) relationship between exogenous sex steroids on susceptibility to microbial pathogens
    2) role of Type 2 immunity in Chlamydia infection
    3) developing cellular immunotherapies to combat infectious disease and cancer

  • Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical researcher interested in evaluating promising new treatments for chronic and severe skin conditions. My research currently includes:

    1) Treatments for itch associated with epidermolysis bullosa

    2) Treatments for atopic dermatitis and other eczematous conditions

    I collaborate with other faculty within the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG) to conduct a variety of investigator initiated and sponsored clinical trials for a variety of inflammatory skin disorders.

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • Valerie Chock

    Valerie Chock

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neurological monitoring in critically ill infants. Altered hemodynamics in neonates, especially in relation to prematurity, congenital heart disease, and central nervous system injury. Determination of the hemodynamic significance and effects of a patent ductus arteriosus in the preterm infant. Utilizing NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) and other technologies for improved monitoring in the NICU.

  • Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests After shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Henry Chubb

    Henry Chubb

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Henry_Chubb

  • Stephanie Clarke

    Stephanie Clarke

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Stephanie Clarke is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Instructor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Clarke is an expert in the treatment of suicidal and self-harming behavior in adolescents, with additional expertise in evidence-based treatment of trauma and eating disorders in adolescents. She is intensively trained in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), currently the only well-established treatment for self-harming adolescents at high risk for suicide. Dr. Clarke is an Attending Psychologist and supervisor in Stanford’s Adolescent DBT Program. She is also the Stanford Psychologist in the DBT Intensive Outpatient Program, RISE, a collaboration between Stanford and Children’s Health Council, where she is in charge of training and supervision of psychology trainees. Dr. Clarke has given numerous talks, trainings, and lectures and has co-authored several publications on the topics of adolescent suicide, self-harming behavior, and DBT.

    Dr. Clarke is currently funded by a grant from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Maternal and Child Health Research Institute to study the safety and feasibility of providing exposure-based trauma treatment to suicidal teens in stage I DBT.

    In 2020, Dr. Clarke was the recipient of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science's Clinical Innovation and Service Award.

  • Michael Cleary

    Michael Cleary

    Lindhard Family Professor in Pediatric Cancer Biology and Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The role of oncoproteins in cancer and development; molecular and cellular biology of hematologic malignancies; targeted molecular therapies of cancer.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of Bioengineering, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Harvey Cohen

    Harvey Cohen

    Deborah E. Addicott - John A. Kriewall and Elizabeth A. Haehl Family Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests extend from hypothesis-driven studies in biochemistry and cell biology to discovery-driven interests in proteomics and systems biology to clinical treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, and pediatric palliative care.

  • Carol Conrad

    Carol Conrad

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary Medicine) at Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in studying the effects of inflammation in the lung, in particular, how N-acetylcysteine may affect and decrease that in CF patients. I am the PI of a multi-center study researching this question. Additionally, in a separate study involving children who have received lung transplants, I am a participating site in an NIH-sponsored observational and mechanistic multi-center study that will examine the role of viral infections in causing chronic graft rejection.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis, MD

    Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evidence based medicine: Systematic reviews, Meta-analyses
    Congenital Infections-Prenatal Screening with Point-Of-Care Tests
    Congenital Toxoplasmosis
    Comparative effectiveness-Comparative safety research
    Outcomes research (Patient safety)
    Antimicrobial Stewardship
    Early Life Antibiotic Use and Weight Gain

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Over the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Victoria Cosgrove

    Victoria Cosgrove

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Cosgrove studies putative roles for life and family stress as well as inflammatory and neurotrophic pathways in the etiology and development of mood disorders across the life span.

  • Helio Costa

    Helio Costa

    Instructor, Pathology

    Bio Helio Costa, PhD, is a medical geneticist with expertise in oncology, medical genetics and genomics, computational biology, data science, software engineering, and product development. He is passionate about leveraging his interdisciplinary skillset to build and develop commercial-grade healthcare tools that aid in patient care and clinical decision support.

    Dr. Costa's research focuses on developing, clinically validating, and implementing new medical diagnostic genetic tests and software for use at Stanford Health Care. His research group is also developing clinical algorithms using large-scale clinical laboratory datasets and patient electronic medical records to predict patient outcomes and aid in therapeutic clinical decision support.

    He is a co-Investigator on the NIH-funded Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) Consortium, and leads the engineering and product management teams developing FDA-recognized medical software applications used by healthcare providers, researchers, and biotechnology companies to define the clinical relevance of genes and mutations identified in patients.

    Dr. Costa is the founding director of the Stanford Clinical Data Science Fellowship where post-doctoral fellows engage in interdisciplinary clinical research and embed in health care workflows learning, building and deploying real-world health data solutions in the Stanford Health Care system. Additionally, he is an Attending Medical Geneticist, and Assistant Lab Director for the Molecular Genetic Pathology Laboratory at Stanford Health Care.

    Dr. Costa received his BS in Genetics from University of California at Davis, his PhD in Genetics from Stanford University School of Medicine, and his ABMGG Clinical Molecular Genetics and Genomics fellowship training from Stanford University School of Medicine.

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