School of Medicine


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  • Maya Adam

    Maya Adam

    Lecturer, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Bio Maya Adam MD has been teaching at Stanford University since 2009. She received her BA in Human Biology from Stanford before studying medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Prior to her post-secondary studies, she spent 10 years as a professional ballet dancer with the State Theater of Saxony in Germany.
    At the Stanford School of Medicine, Adam creates online educational content for the Re-imagining Medical Education Project, led by Charles Prober MD, Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education. In the Program in Human Biology, Adam teaches courses on child health and nutrition. In 2013, Adam created the free, massive open online course Stanford Child Nutrition and Cooking, a public health education outreach effort that has reached more than 230,000 international students. She is also the founder of a non-profit organization called Just Cook for Kids. In 2014, Adam started applying the new teaching technologies being developed at Stanford to the creation of digital teaching tools designed to support the work of international community health workers. The resulting Stanford Health Outreach App is now being used by community health organizations in South Africa and Guatemala and the teaching videos associated with the app have been translated into Xhosa, Spanish and Hindi. In 2015 Adam created the online CME course Food and Medicine and the parallel open online course, Food and Health. She is the author of Food Love Family: A Practical Guide to Child Nutrition.

  • Manuel Amieva

    Manuel Amieva

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies the strategies pathogens utilize to colonize and subvert the epithelial barrier. We have focused on the epithelial junctions as a target for bacterial pathogens, since the cell-cell junctions serve as both a barrier to infection and also a major control site for epithelial function. In particular, we are interested in how the gastric pathogen Helicobater pylori may cause cancer by interfering with cell signaling at the epithelial junctions. We are also studying how various bacteria cross and invade the epithelium. For example, we recently found that Listeria monocytogenes targets a specialized subset of cell-cell junctions at the tip of the intestinal villi to find its receptor for invasion. We are interested in determining whether this mode of gastrointestinal invasion of the epithelium is also used by other gastrointestinal pathogens.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.