School of Medicine


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  • Maheen Mausoof Adamson

    Maheen Mausoof Adamson

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Maheen Mausoof Adamson is the senior scientific research director for Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. She is also the clinical associate professor of Neurosurgery and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine. Adamson completed her undergraduate degrees in neurobiology and women studies at the University of California, Irvine. She completed her Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California and a postdoctoral fellowship in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine.

    Dr. Adamson’s expertise and interests span employing translational neuroscience methodologies for diagnostic and neuromodulation treatments (such as repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)) for frequent health problems in patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). She has employed advanced structural and functional imaging modalities and biomarker assessments in Veteran, active military and civilian populations with brain injury. She has been a leader in identifying gender differences in brain injury, particularly in the Veteran population. She currently serves as PI and Site-PI on numerous neuromodulation clinical trials under the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense funded grants.

    Dr. Adamson has authored numerous peer-reviewed publications on the cognitive and neural basis of Alzheimer’s disease and on a wide range of topics in TBI. She has received recognition in national and international settings. She is also intricately involved in mentoring research postdoctoral fellows and clinical residents in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery departments at Stanford Medical School. Her goal is to incorporate advanced treatment and diagnostics tailored to each patient's needs into standard-of-care to improve their daily function, reintegration into society and long-term rehabilitation after brain injury.

  • Michelle Cheng

    Michelle Cheng

    Sr Res Scientist-Basic Life, Neurosurgery

    Current Role at Stanford I am a senior scientist in Dr. Gary's Steinberg's lab. I supervise several projects that use optogenetics, imaging techniques and next generation sequencing to study post-stroke neural circuit dynamics and recovery mechanisms. My main interests are to study how the brain recovers from injury at both the neural circuit and molecular level, and to develop strategies to promote the recovery process.

  • Ricardo De Azevedo Pereira

    Ricardo De Azevedo Pereira

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Neurosurgery

    Bio Ricardo Azevedo-Pereira has a B.S. in Biological Sciences and a Masters in Parasitology with focus on immunology and protein purification of Leishmania protozoan. He received his PhD at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro where he investigated the role of cysteine proteases in differentiation of embryonic stem cells into neural cells. Additionally, he stablished a protocol to isolate human neural stem cells from adult patient with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. During his PhD, he received a fellowship as visiting scholar to study the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and iPS cells into photoreceptors cells at University of Washington, Seattle, under supervision of Dr. Thomas Reh. During his postdoc at Stanford in the Department of Dermatology, he investigated the mechanisms of hair follicle stem cells activation and hair growth by subcutaneous injection of laminin 511. At the Steinberg lab, he is now applying Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP), RNA sequencing and bioinformatic approaches to study the mechanism underlying stroke recovery after human neural stem cells transplantation. As a Research Scientist, he is involved in several projects including: neural stem cells secretome and brain plasticity by expression of perineuronal nets in different cortical layers in stroke models.