School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 16 Results

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular & Cellular Physiology, of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting single-molecule/particle reconstitution and imaging experiments, combined with high-resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. A second goal is to develop advanced biomolecular imaging methods at the molecular scale.

  • Zev Bryant

    Zev Bryant

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. My laboratory seeks to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work.

  • Patricia Cross

    Patricia Cross

    Professor (Teaching) of Structural Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am not now actively involved in research, but my past endeavors remain central to my position in guiding medical students in their scholarship pursuits.
    The cited publications represent three areas of interest:
    (1) medical student research (Jacobs and Cross)
    (2) women in medicine (Cross and Steward)
    (3) the reproductive physiology of early development (Cross and Brinster)
    Only one publication is listed in this area since the research is not current, but others (in e.g. Nature, DevBiol, ExpCellRes) give a broader picture of my pursuit when at the University of Pennsylvania.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Ted Jardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Roger Kornberg

    Roger Kornberg

    Mrs. George A. Winzer Professor in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the regulation of transcription, the first step in gene expression. The main lines of our work are 1) reconstitution of the process with more than 50 pure proteins and mechanistic analysis, 2) structure determination of the 50 protein complex at atomic resolution, and 3) studies of chromatin remodelling, required for transcription of the DNA template in living cells

  • Michael Levitt

    Michael Levitt

    Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor in Cancer Research in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests having pioneered, we (a) predict folding of a polypeptide and RNA chains into a unique native-structure, we (b) model protein structure using the well-established paradigms that similar protein sequences imply similar three-dimensional structures, and (c) we are focusing on mesoscale modeling of large macromolecular complexes such as RNA polymerase and the mammalian chaperonin.

  • David B. McKay

    David B. McKay

    Professor of Structural Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Three-dimensional structure determination and biophysical studies of macromolecules.

  • Vijay Pande

    Vijay Pande

    Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The central theme of our research is to develop and apply novel theoretical methods to understand the physical properties of biological molecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipid membranes, and small molecule therapeutics (eg protein folding or lipid vesicle fusion). As these phenomena are complex, my research employs novel theoretical and computational techniques. We apply these methods to develop novel therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease.

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