School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 113 Results

  • Kimberly Allison

    Kimberly Allison

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Allison’s clinical expertise is in breast pathology. Her research interests include how standards should be applied to breast cancer diagnostics (such as HER2 testing), the utility of molecular panel-based testing in breast cancer, and identifying the most appropriate management of specific pathologic diagnoses. She is also the author of “Red Sunshine”, a memoir about her personal experience with breast cancer, a topic which she speaks about to both patient and health care audiences.

  • Jennifer Andrews

    Jennifer Andrews

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include: education of clinical residents and fellows regarding safe and effective transfusion practices, iron overload from red blood cell transfusions in pediatric hematology/oncology patients and leveraging technology to improve clinical practice around blood transfusion.

  • Daniel A. Arber, M.D.

    Daniel A. Arber, M.D.

    Ronald F. Dorfman, MBBch, FRCPath Professor in Hematopathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I study molecular genetic and immunophenotypic changes in human hematopoietic neoplasms. These include acute and chronic leukemias, lymphoma, and splenic tumors.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on the application of genomics to medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. We also use network approaches to characterize biology. The wet bench is where we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality of our favorite targets.

  • Susan Atwater

    Susan Atwater

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in optimizing the process of diagnosing leukemias, lymphomas and other hematolymphoid neoplasms, particularly by the use of diagnostic flow cytometry. One goal is to develop flow data analysis processes that function as interactive tools, allowing pathologists to query rich diagnostic data sets in real time.

  • Jeffrey Axelrod

    Jeffrey Axelrod

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

  • Niaz Banaei

    Niaz Banaei

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests His research interests include (1) development, assessment, and improvement of novel infectious diseases diagnostics, (2) enhancing the quality of C. difficile diagnostic results, and (3) characterization of M. tuberculosis virulence determinants.

  • Ellen Jo Baron

    Ellen Jo Baron

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In the Microbiology laboratory, we evaluate cutting-edge new technology for rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases, and we work with high-tech companies to help them develop new diagnostic assays at the pre-market stage. We do not perform basic research and we do not have any fellowship support.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF – Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ‘normal’ human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

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