Showing 1-10 of 21 Results

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

  • Marcus Feldman

    Marcus Feldman

    Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Human genetic and cultural evolution, mathematical biology, demography of China

  • Russell D. Fernald

    Russell D. Fernald

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In the course of evolution,two of the strongest selective forces in nature,light and sex, have left their mark on living organisms. I am interested in how the development and function of the nervous system reflects these events. We use the reproductive system to understand how social behavior influences the main system of reproductive action controlled by a collection of cells in the brain containing gonodotropin releasing hormone(GnRH)

  • Hunter Fraser

    Hunter Fraser

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the regulation and evolution of gene expression using a combination of experimental and computational approaches.

    Our work brings together quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, and evolutionary biology to achieve a deeper understanding of how genetic variation within and between species affects genome-wide gene expression and ultimately shapes the phenotypic diversity of life.

  • Judith Frydman

    Judith Frydman

    Professor of Biology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long term goal of our research is to understand how proteins fold in living cells. My lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to address fundamental questions about molecular chaperones, protein folding and degradation. In addition to basic mechanistic principles, we aim to define how impairment of cellular folding and quality control are linked to disease, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases and examine whether reengineering chaperone networks can provide therapeutic strategies.

  • Or Gozani

    Or Gozani

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the molecular mechanisms by which chromatin-signaling networks effect nuclear and epigenetic programs, and how dysregulation of these pathways leads to disease. Our work centers on the biology of lysine methylation, a principal chromatin-regulatory mechanism that directs epigenetic processes. We study how lysine methylation events are generated, sensed, and transduced, and how these chemical marks integrate with other nuclear signaling systems to govern diverse cellular functions.

  • Philip C. Hanawalt

    Philip C. Hanawalt

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor in Biology and Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our current research focuses in two principal areas:

    1. The molecular basis for diseases in which the pathway of transcription-coupled DNA repair is defective, including Cockyne syndrome (CS) and UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS). Patients are severely sensitive to sunlight but get no cancers. See Hanawalt & Spivak, 2008, for review.

    2. Transcription arrest by guanine-rich DNA sequences and non-canonical secondary structures. Transcription collisions with replication forks.

  • Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Professor of Pathology, Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function and evolution of the Myb oncogene family; function and evolution of E2F transcriptional regulators and RB tumor suppressors; epigenetic regulation of chromatin and chromosomes; cancer genetics.

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are studying how neural circuits are assembled during development, and how they contribute to sensory perception. We are addressing these questions at different levels from molecular, cellular, circuit to animal behavior. We are primarily using Drosophila as a model organism for our studies. Most recently, we are also developing novel genetic tools in the mouse to extend our studies to the mammalian brain.

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