School of Medicine


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  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary area of interest is understanding the pathogenesis of problem behaviors shown by individuals diagnosed with neurogenetic disorders such as fragile X syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. I study methods for determining how environmental and biological factors can affect the development of aberrant behaviors in these syndromes. The end goal of my research is to create patient-specific methods for treating the symptoms of these disorders.

  • Booil Jo

    Booil Jo

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Latent Variable Modeling, Causal Inference, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Missing Data Analysis, Mixture and Growth Mixture Modeling, Prevention Science Methodology.

  • Shelli Kesler, PhD

    Shelli Kesler, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Shelli Kesler is an Assistant Professor and Clinical Neuropsychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kesler’s academic research program focuses on the application of cognitive neuroscience to the study of clinical populations. Her laboratory seeks to identify the biological mechanisms underlying cognitive deficit, develop and implement novel behavioral interventions for cognitive dysfunction and improve cognitive neuroscience research methodology by introducing new tools for neuroimaging analyses.

    Dr. Kesler is particularly interested in the neurotoxic effects of cancer, often referred to as “chemobrain”. She has helped advance this field of research by demonstrating that chemotherapy is associated with a pattern of subtle but diffuse brain injury. She has also introduced a novel, home-based cognitive training program for cancer survivors who are struggling with cognitive difficulties. She was a recipient of the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award in 2008 for her research in cognition and cancer. Dr. Kesler is unique in that her research and clinical practice involves both children and adults. She has authored over 50 scientific publications as well as the book “Improving Cognitive Function After Cancer” for lay readers.

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

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