School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 18 Results

  • Paul Berg

    Paul Berg

    Emeritus Faculty, Acad Council, Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests For about 10 years until 2000, my lab's research activities were focused on the mechanism of recombinational repair of double-strand breaks in DNA. We focused our efforts on two model systems: one involved the repair of restriction enzyme cleavages at specific mammalian chromosomal loci and the second explored the biochemical properties of purified yeast Rad51 protein, an essential catalyst for synapsing the broken ends of DNA with an intact homologue of that sequence. We also explored the roles of Rad52 and PRA (single-strand DNA binding protein) in the repair process.

    In 2000, I became Emeritus Professor in Biochemistry and stepped down from the Directorship of the Beckman Center. Much of my activities since then have been involved in writing a biography of the genetics pioneer George Beadle, published in 2003, plus articles for other publications elaborating on Beadle's legacy for today's science. Over the years I have been and continue to be an activist in public policy issues affecting biomedical issues, e.g. recombinant DNA and more recently, issues concerning embryonic stem cells.

  • Onn Brandman

    Onn Brandman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Brandman Lab studies how cells ensure protein quality and how they signal stress. To achieve this, we employ an integrated set of techniques including single cell anaysis of stress pathways, structural studies, in vitro translation, and full genome screens in yeast and mammalian cells.

  • Patrick O. Brown

    Patrick O. Brown

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Brown's research group uses diverse experimental and computational methods to investigate the logic and mechanisms that control a genome's expression program. The Brown laboratory is systematically characterizing the genetic scripts that control the expression of our genes, in normal development and physiology and in diseases like cancer, with a particular focus on post-transcriptional regulation. The Brown lab also develops strategies and assays for early detection and diagnosis of cancer.

  • Douglas L. Brutlag

    Douglas L. Brutlag

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary interest is to understand the flow of information from the genome to the phenotype of an organism. This interest includes predicting the structure and function of genes and proteins from their primary sequence, predicting function from structure simulating protein folding and ligand docking, and predicitng disease from genome variations. These goals are the same as the goals of molecular biology, however, we use primarily computational approaches.

  • Rhiju Das

    Rhiju Das

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab seeks an agile and predictive understanding of how nucleic acid and protein codes underlie the activities of living systems. We are creating new computational and chemical tools to tackle the de novo modeling of protein and RNA puzzles, the biophysics of functional and random RNAs, and the design of new RNA shapes and switches.

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

  • Pehr Harbury

    Pehr Harbury

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab engineers proteins and small-molecule drugs at atomic resolution through a combination of structural calculations and combinatorial library synthesis. Our goal is to elucidate predictive principles by which novel shapes and catalytic properties can be conferred accurately on designed polypeptides.

  • Daniel Herschlag

    Daniel Herschlag

    Senior Associate Dean, Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs and Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemistry and of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is aimed at understanding the chemical and physical behavior underlying biological macromolecules and systems, as these behaviors define the capabilities and limitations of biology. Toward this end we study folding and catalysis by RNA, as well as catalysis by protein enzymes.

  • A Dale Kaiser

    A Dale Kaiser

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests How are genes regulated to construct a developmental program? How do signals received from other cells change the program and coordinate it for multicellular development? The approach taken by our laboratory group to answer these questions utilizes biochemistry and genetics; genetics to isolate mutants that have particular defects in development and biochemistry to determine the molecular basis of the defects. We study swarming in Myxococcus xanthus that builds fruiting bodies.

  • Peter S. Kim

    Peter S. Kim

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in understanding the mechanism of viral membrane fusion and its inhibition by drugs and antibodies. The HIV envelope protein (gp120/gp41) serves as a model system. The ultimate goal is to create an HIV vaccine.

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