Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Institution Review Board, Cancer Prevention Institute of California (CPIC) (2003 - 2006)

Professional Education


  • DrPH, UC Berkeley, Public Health (1998)
  • MPP, Harvard University, Public Policy (1986)
  • BA, UCLA, Economics (1983)

Community and International Work


  • Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training's Pan Asian Council, San Francisco

    Topic

    Cancer

    Populations Served

    Asian Americans

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Vietnamese Community Center of the East Bay, Oakland

    Topic

    Health and social services

    Populations Served

    Vietnamese Americans

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Vietnamese Reach for Health Coalition, Santa Clara County

    Topic

    Cancer control

    Populations Served

    Vietnamese Americans

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Vietnamese Community Health Promotion Project's Community Advisory Board, San Francisco

    Partnering Organization(s)

    University of California, San Francisco

    Populations Served

    Vietnamese Americans

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • American Cancer Society Diversity/Disparity Team, California

    Topic

    Cancer

    Partnering Organization(s)

    California Division

    Populations Served

    Underserved communities

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Cancer Prevention and Early Detection – Dr. Nguyen is interested in prevention and early detection of breast, cervical, colorectal, and liver cancer. He is a principal investigator on a study to evaluate the effectiveness of a lay health worker intervention supported by a media campaign to increase colorectal cancer screening in Vietnamese Americans.

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Effectiveness of a Controlled Trial to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening in Vietnamese Americans AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Nguyen, B. H., McPhee, S. J., Stewart, S. L., Doan, H. T. 2010; 100 (5): 870-876

    Abstract

    We conducted a controlled trial of a public education and provider intervention to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates among Vietnamese Americans, who typically have lower rates than non-Hispanic Whites.The public education intervention included a Vietnamese-language CRC screening media campaign, distribution of health educational material, and a hotline. The provider intervention consisted of continuing medical education seminars, newsletters, and DVDs. Vietnamese in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California, received the intervention from 2004 to 2006; Vietnamese in Harris County, Texas, were controls and received no intervention. A quasi-experimental study design with pre- and postintervention surveys of the same 533 participants was used to evaluate the combined intervention.The postintervention-to-preintervention odds ratio for having ever had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy was 1.4 times greater in the intervention community than in the control community. Knowledge and attitudes mediated the effect of the intervention on CRC screening behavior. Media exposure mediated the effect of the intervention on knowledge.Improving CRC knowledge through the media contributed to the effectiveness of the intervention.

    View details for DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2009.166231

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276828800022

    View details for PubMedID 20299659

  • Effectiveness of Continuing Medical Education in Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge among Vietnamese American Physicians JOURNAL OF HEALTH CARE FOR THE POOR AND UNDERSERVED Nguyen, B. H., Pham, J. T., Chew, R. A., McPhee, S. J., Stewart, S. L., Doan, H. T. 2010; 21 (2): 568-581

    Abstract

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are lower in Vietnamese Americans than in non-Hispanic Whites. Most Vietnamese Americans have ethnically concordant physicians and are willing to have CRC screening if their physicians recommend it. We conducted two continuing medical education (CME) seminars with participants recruited from the Vietnamese Physician Association of Northern California to increase their CRC screening knowledge. We used pre- and post-CME surveys to evaluate the CMEs and per-item McNemar's tests to assess changes in knowledge. Correct responses increased significantly from pre- to post-CME for all five items on CRC burden and four of 11 items on screening guidelines and practices at the first CME and for five of seven items on screening guidelines and practices at the second CME. Continuing medical education seminars were effective in increasing CRC screening knowledge among Vietnamese American physicians. This increase may lead to physicians' recommending and their patients' completing CRC screening tests.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000277523200013

    View details for PubMedID 20453357

  • Colorectal cancer screening in Vietnamese Americans JOURNAL OF CANCER EDUCATION Nguyen, B. H., McPhee, S. J., Stewart, S. L., Doan, H. T. 2008; 23 (1): 37-45

    Abstract

    Rates of colorectal cancer screening in Vietnamese Americans are lower than those in non-Hispanic Whites. In this article, we describe rates of colorectal screening, identify determinants, and recommend educational strategies to improve screening.A cross-sectional sample of 867 Vietnamese aged 50 to 74 years drawn from a sampling frame of individuals in the Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California, and Harris County, Texas, area telephone directories with Vietnamese surnames were interviewed in 2004.Colorectal screening recognition, receipt, currency, and intention rates were low.Although the screening rates are low, Vietnamese are receptive to screening if providers recommend it.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/08858190701849395

    View details for Web of Science ID 000254918300006

    View details for PubMedID 18444045

  • Attitudes toward Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer Prevention among Chinese Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area, California ASIAN PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CANCER PREVENTION Chang, E. T., Nguyen, B. H., So, S. K. 2008; 9 (4): 605-613

    Abstract

    Chronic hepatitis B and associated liver cancer constitute important health threats with disparity among Asian/Pacific Islander Americans (APIs). However, many APIs are unaware of and unprotected against these diseases.To inform the development of community-based programs to increase hepatitis B and liver cancer awareness and prevention among APIs, we conducted a series of qualitative focus groups in 2007 to identify motivations and deterrents related to hepatitis B education, testing, and vaccination among San Francisco Bay Area Chinese Americans. Six focus groups were held in Cantonese, English, or Mandarin for women or men, respectively. Recorded transcripts were transcribed, translated, and then coded by consensus.Factors that motivated individuals to be tested for hepatitis B included peace of mind, prevention of transmission to others, informed decision-making ability, convenience, and pre-vaccination screening. Primary motivations for hepatitis B vaccination were protection of future health and avoidance of hepatitis B. However, factors that discouraged people from testing or vaccination included costs, lack of health insurance, fear of side effects, worries about reliability or efficacy, poor patient-doctor communication, reliance on professional opinion, apparent good health, inconvenience, and personal preference. Individuals were generally in favor of informing relatives and friends about hepatitis B testing and vaccination, and offered several reasons for and against educating others about these activities.In summary, our study identifies common attitudes and influences regarding the decision to take preventive action against hepatitis B and liver cancer. These findings can be applied toward the design of more effective educational and outreach materials and programs for Chinese Americans and possibly other APIs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000269713600014

    View details for PubMedID 19256747

  • Using focus groups to develop interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening among Vietnamese Americans JOURNAL OF CANCER EDUCATION Nguyen, B. H., Vo, P. H., Doan, H. T., McPhee, S. J. 2006; 21 (2): 80-83

    Abstract

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Vietnamese Americans. Their colorectal screening rates are lower than the rates of whites.Four focus groups were conducted to identify Vietnamese American sources and credibility of health information, media utilization, and intervention approaches.Vietnamese Americans trusted doctors and patient testimonials and had access to, and received most of their health information from, Vietnamese- language print and electronic media. Recommended intervention approaches include promoting doctors' recommendation of screening and using Vietnamese-language mass media, print materials, and oral presentations.Focus groups are useful in determining communication channels and intervention approaches.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000241750200007

    View details for PubMedID 17020518

  • The effect of access and satisfaction on regular mammogram and Papanicolaou test screening in a multiethnic population MEDICAL CARE Somkin, C. P., McPhee, S. J., Nguyen, T., Stewart, S., Shema, S. J., Nguyen, B., Pasick, R. 2004; 42 (9): 914-926

    Abstract

    Access and satisfaction are determinants of preventive service use, but few studies have evaluated their role in breast and cervical cancer screening in multiethnic populations.We sought to investigate the relationship between race/ethnicity, access, satisfaction, and regular mammogram and Papanicolaou test receipt in 5 racial/ethnic groups.We conducted a telephone survey in 4 languages.Our subjects were black, Chinese, Filipino, Latino, or white women aged 40 to 74 residing in Alameda County, California.Outcome: regular mammograms (last test within 15 months and another within 2 years prior) and Papanicolaou tests (36 months and 3 years, respectively). Independent: race/ethnicity, sociodemographic variables, access (health insurance, usual site of care, regular doctor, check-up within 12 months, knowing where to go, copayment for tests), and satisfaction (overall satisfaction scale, waiting times, test-related pain and embarrassment, test satisfaction).Among women who had ever had a mammogram or Papanicolaou test, 54% and 77%, respectively, received regular screening. In multivariate analyses, regular mammography was positively associated with increased age (odds ratio [OR] 1.05 per year), private insurance (OR 1.7), check-up in the past year (OR 2.3), knowing where to go for mammography (OR 3.0), and greater satisfaction with processes of care (OR 1.04 per unit), and negatively with not knowing copayment amount (OR 0.4), too many forms to fill out (OR 0.5), embarrassment at the last mammogram (OR 0.6), and Filipino race/ethnicity. Similar results were found for regular Papanicolaou tests.Access and satisfaction are important predictors of screening but do little to explain racial/ethnic variation. Tailored interventions to improve regular mammography and Papanicolaou test screening in multiethnic populations are needed.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223677800012

    View details for PubMedID 15319618

  • Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in Latino and Vietnamese Americans - Compared with non-Latino white Americans JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE Walsh, J. M., Kaplan, C. P., Nguyen, B., Gildengorin, G., McPhee, S. J., Perez-Stable, E. J. 2004; 19 (2): 156-166

    Abstract

    To identify current colorectal cancer (CRC) screening practices and barriers to screening in the Latino, Vietnamese, and non-Latino white populations.We conducted a telephone survey of Latino, non-Latino white, and Vietnamese individuals living in San Jose, California. We asked about demographics, CRC screening practices, intentions to be screened, and barriers and facilitators to screening.Seven hundred and seventy-five individuals (40% white, 29.2% Latino, and 30.8% Vietnamese) completed the survey (Response Rate 50%). Overall, 23% of respondents reported receipt of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the past year, 28% reported sigmoidoscopy (SIG) in the past 5 years, and 27% reported colonoscopy (COL) in the past 10 years. Screening rates were generally lower in Latinos and Vietnamese. Vietnamese were less likely than whites to have had SIG in the past 5 years (odds ratio [OR], 0.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09 to 0.72), but ethnicity was not an independent predictor of FOBT or COL. Only 22% of Vietnamese would find endoscopic tests uncomfortable compared with 79% of whites (P <.05). While 21% of Latinos would find performing an FOBT embarrassing, only 8% of whites and 3% of Vietnamese felt this way (P <.05). Vietnamese were more likely than whites to plan to have SIG in the next 5 years (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.15 to 4.38), but ethnicity was not associated with planning to have FOBT or COL.Rates of CRC screening are lower in ethnic minority populations than in whites. Differences in attitudes and perceived barriers suggest that culturally tailored interventions to increase CRC screening will be useful in these populations

    View details for Web of Science ID 000189293100007

    View details for PubMedID 15009795

  • Validation of recall of breast and cervical cancer screening by women in an ethnically diverse population PREVENTIVE MEDICINE McPhee, S. J., Nguyen, T. T., Shema, S. J., Nguyen, B., Somkin, C., Vo, P., Pasick, R. 2002; 35 (5): 463-473

    Abstract

    Screening mammogram and Pap smear rates are lower for women in underserved racial and ethnic groups, yet may be overestimated due to reliance on patients' self-reports. The purpose of this study was to determine accuracy of self-reports of mammograms and Pap smears in a multiethnic, multilingual population of African American, Latina, Chinese, Filipina, and White women residing in low-income census tracts of Alameda County, California.Following a baseline telephone survey of 1,464 women regarding receipt of mammograms and Pap smears, we examined computerized and written medical records to validate the dates and locations of tests reported by women.Of 1,464 subjects, 94.9% reported having had a Pap smear, and 87% reported having had a mammogram. For Pap smears, in a subsample of 448 cases, we validated only 69.4% of the women's self-reports, and for mammography, in a subsample of 846 women, we validated only 75.4% of the self-reports. Validation rates differed significantly by ethnicity and site of care for both Pap smears and mammograms.Population estimates of breast and cervical cancer screening rates based upon patient self-reports need to be adjusted downward, by as much as one-quarter to one-third, for low-income, ethnic women.

    View details for DOI 10.1006/pmed.2002.1096

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179113900007

    View details for PubMedID 12431895

  • Does willingness to pay vary by race/ethnicity? An analysis using mammography among low-income women HEALTH POLICY Wagner, T. H., Hu, T. W., Duenas, G. V., Kaplan, C. P., Nguyen, B. H., Pasick, R. J. 2001; 58 (3): 275-288

    Abstract

    As part of a population-based intervention to improve periodic mammogram screening, we examined WTP for mammography in five ethnic groups. Through random digit dialing, we contacted households in low-income census tracts of Alameda County, California (San Francisco Bay area). Women who met the ethnicity, age and cancer-free eligibility criteria were invited to participate. For the baseline assessment, women were surveyed over the phone in their preferred language. Of the 1465 surveyed women, 499 identified themselves as African-American, 199 were Chinese, 167 were Filipino, 300 were Latina, and 300 were non-Hispanic white. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed that WTP varied significantly by ethnicity (P<0.05). We also found that when Filipino and Chinese women had a female relative with breast cancer, they were willing to pay less money for a mammogram. African-American, Latino, and non-Hispanic white women, however, were willing to pay more money for a mammogram if a female relative had had breast cancer. This ethnic difference, when there is a familial link to breast cancer, needs further study as it has implication for genetic testing. Nevertheless, WTP studies that do not account for ethnic differences may be overstating net benefits to society.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172122700006

    View details for PubMedID 11641004

  • Abnormal pap smear follow-up in a high-risk population CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION Engelstad, L. P., Stewart, S. L., Nguyen, B. H., Bedeian, K. L., Rubin, M. M., Pasick, R. J., Hiatt, R. A. 2001; 10 (10): 1015-1020

    Abstract

    Low-income women are at high risk of developing cervical cancer attributable not only to the higher prevalence of risk factors in this population but also to the lack of timely follow-up of abnormal Pap smears. This study evaluates the efficacy of an aggressive follow-up strategy. Women with abnormal Pap smear results after screening in a public hospital emergency department were randomly assigned to follow-up either by a case-managed approach using computerized tracking and universal colposcopy or by traditional care. The main outcome was the proportion of women receiving follow-up in 6 months. A secondary outcome was the proportion of women receiving follow-up by 6 months and diagnostic resolution in 18 months. Of 54 women in the intervention group, 65% kept at least one follow-up appointment in 6 months compared with 41% of the 54 women in the control group (P = 0.012). Half the women in the intervention group versus 19% of women in the control group had follow-up in 6 months and diagnostic resolution in 18 months (P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, initial Pap smear result, and race/ethnicity, the odds of having follow-up in 6 months were four times greater for women in the intervention group (odds ratio = 4.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-9.7), and the odds of having both follow-up in 6 months and diagnostic resolution in 18 months were more than six times greater (odds ratio = 6.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.4-17.8). This study demonstrates that an aggressive follow-up strategy significantly improves the rate of both initial follow-up and diagnostic resolution of abnormal Pap smears among low-income women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance when compared with traditional care.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000171492900001

    View details for PubMedID 11588126

  • Promoting cancer prevention activities among Vietnamese physicians in California JOURNAL OF CANCER EDUCATION Nguyen, B. H., Nguyen, K. P., McPhee, S. J., Nguyen, A. T., Tran, D. Q., Jenkins, C. N. 2000; 15 (2): 82-85

    Abstract

    To promote prevention and early detection of cancer, the authors conducted a three-year intervention targeting Vietnamese physicians in solo practice in California.Twenty subjects who had received their medical training in Vietnam were recruited into a randomized controlled trial. The intervention included computerized or manual cancer screening reminders, continuing medical education seminars, Vietnamese-language health education materials, newsletters, and oncology data-query programs. Evaluation included chart audits for eight targeted activities pre- and post-intervention.Before the intervention, annual physician performance rates were low for all eight activities: routine checkups (65.6%), Pap testing (13.8%), pelvic examinations (19.8%), clinical breast examinations (13.3%), mammography (6.4%), hepatitis B serologies (21.9%), hepatitis B immunizations (12.8%), and smoking cessation counseling (1.6%). After the intervention, performance rates increased significantly for smoking cessation counseling (p = 0.02), Pap testing (p = 0.004), and pelvic examinations (p = 0.01).The results demonstrate the efficacy of an intervention targeting Vietnamese primary care physicians in promoting smoking cessation counseling, Pap testing, and pelvic examinations, but not other cancer prevention activities.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000088680500006

    View details for PubMedID 10879896

  • Effect of a media-led education campaign on breast and cervical cancer screening among Vietnamese-American women PREVENTIVE MEDICINE Jenkins, C. N., McPhee, S. J., Bird, J. A., Pham, G. Q., Nguyen, B. H., Nguyen, T., Lai, K. Q., Wong, C., Davis, T. B. 1999; 28 (4): 395-406

    Abstract

    Previous research has shown that breast and cervical cancer screening rates are low among Vietnamese women.Over a 24-month period, we implemented a media-led community education campaign to promote recognition, intention, receipt, and currency of routine checkups, clinical breast examinations, mammograms, and Pap tests among Vietnamese-American women in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties in northern California. Women in Los Angeles and Orange Counties in southern California served as controls. To evaluate its impact, pretest telephone interviews were conducted of 451 randomly selected women in the intervention area and 482 women in the control area and posttest interviews with 454 and 422 women, respectively.At posttest, after controlling for demographic differences in the surveyed populations, the odds ratios for the intervention effect were statistically significant for having heard of a general checkup, Paptest, and clinical breast examination (CBE); planning to have a checkup, Pap test, CBE, and mammogram; and having had a checkup and Pap test. The intervention had no effect on being up to date for any of the tests.A media-led education intervention succeeded in increasing recognition of and intention to undertake screening tests more than receipt of or currency with the tests.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079556800009

    View details for PubMedID 10090869

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