Bio

Bio


Auriel T. August MD is a general surgery resident at Stanford Hospital as well as a Stanford Byers Biodesign Innovation Fellow. She received her undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering from Duke University. While at Duke she also served as the Vice President of the National Society of Black Engineers, focusing her efforts on community outreach to Durham public schools. She later obtained her medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School where she received a grant to study pulmonary function in pediatric HIV patients in Tanzania. Dr. August intends to spend her career using community outreach and technology to close the gap in healthcare delivery both domestically and abroad.

Clinical Focus


  • Residency

Honors & Awards


  • Search For Hidden Figures Contest, Semi-Finalist, Pepsi Co (2016)
  • Go Red for Women Scholarship, American Heart Association (2015)
  • Global Health Research Fellowship, Dickey Center for International Understanding (2014)
  • Helen's Fund Pediatric Research Grant, Children's Hospital at Dartmouth (2014)
  • Howard Hughes Undergraduate Research Fellowship, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (2009)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Vice-Chair, Stanford GME Diversity Committee (2017 - Present)
  • Northeast Regional Chair, AAMC Organization of Student Representatives (2015 - 2017)
  • Vice President, National Society of Black Engineers - Duke Chapter (2009 - 2012)

Professional Education


  • M.D., Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Medicine (2017)
  • B.S., Duke University, Pratt School of Engineering, Biomedical Engineering (2012)

Community and International Work


  • East Palo Alto Boys and Girls Club Volunteer

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Boys and Girls Clubs of America

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Stanford SMASH volunteer

    Topic

    Mentorship

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Stanford-Surgery Policy Improvement Research & Education Center

    Populations Served

    Minority High School Students

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Gender Equity in Global Surgery Mentor, Kenya

    Topic

    Peer Mentorship

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Harvard Program in Global Surgery and Social Change

    Populations Served

    Sub-Saharan Africa

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Peer Navigator

    Topic

    Cancer Disparities in the African American Community

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Stanford Office for Community Engagement

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Studying Pulmonary Function in HIV Positive Tanzanian Youth, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    Topic

    Lung Disease in Children Living with HIV

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Dickey Center for International Understanding

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Personal Interests


Surgical Oncology
Pediatric Surgery
Health Disparities
Surgical Device Innovation

Publications

All Publications


  • Fluoroscopic-assisted laparoscopic retrieval of retained glucose sensor wire from the omentum CLINICAL CASE REPORTS Sang, A. X., Lal, R., August, A., Danzer, E., Buckingham, B., Mueller, C. M. 2019

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccr3.2348

    View details for Web of Science ID 000478842500001

  • The Golden Hour After Injury Among Civilians Caught in Conflict Zones. Disaster medicine and public health preparedness Forrester, J. D., August, A., Cai, L. Z., Kushner, A. L., Wren, S. M. 2019: 1–9

    Abstract

    ABSTRACTIntroduction:The term "golden hour" describes the first 60 minutes after patients sustain injury. In resource-available settings, rapid transport to trauma centers within this time period is standard-of-care. We compared transport times of injured civilians in modern conflict zones to assess the degree to which injured civilians are transported within the golden hour in these environments.We evaluated PubMed, Ovid, and Web of Science databases for manuscripts describing transport time after trauma among civilian victims of trauma from January 1990 to November 2017.The initial database search identified 2704 abstracts. Twenty-nine studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conflicts in Yugoslavia/Bosnia/Herzegovina, Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Israel, Cambodia, Somalia, Georgia, Lebanon, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Turkey were represented, describing 47 273 patients. Only 7 (24%) manuscripts described transport times under 1 hour. Transport typically required several hours to days.Anticipated transport times have important implications for field triage of injured persons in civilian conflict settings because existing overburdened civilian health care systems may become further overwhelmed if in-hospital health capacity is unable to keep pace with inflow of the severely wounded.

    View details for DOI 10.1017/dmp.2019.42

    View details for PubMedID 31203832

  • Laparoscopic Liver Resection in Cirrhosis: The Challenge of the Posterosuperior Segments Laparoscopic Surgery August, A. T., Visser, B. C. 2019

    View details for DOI 10.21037/ls.2019.07.04

  • Early recognition is important when multiple magnets masquerade as a single chain after foreign body ingestion JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC SURGERY CASE REPORTS August, A., Mueller, C. 2016; 13: 8-+
  • Characterizing Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Methamphetamine-Induced Circling Behavior in Hemi-Parkinsonian Rats IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING So, R. Q., McConnell, G. C., August, A. T., Grill, W. M. 2012; 20 (5): 626–35

    Abstract

    The unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model is frequently used to study the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, systematic knowledge of the effects of DBS parameters on behavior in this animal model is lacking. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of DBS on methamphetamine-induced circling in the unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rat. DBS parameters tested include stimulation amplitude, stimulation frequency, methamphetamine dose, stimulation polarity, and anatomical location of the electrode. When an appropriate stimulation amplitude and dose of methamphetamine were applied, high-frequency stimulation (> 130 Hz), but not low frequency stimulation (< 10 Hz), reversed the bias in ipsilateral circling without inhibiting movement. This characteristic frequency tuning profile was only generated when at least one electrode used during bipolar stimulation was located within the STN. No difference was found between bipolar stimulation and monopolar stimulation when the most effective electrode contact was selected, indicating that monopolar stimulation could be used in future experiments. Methamphetamine-induced circling is a simple, reliable, and sensitive behavioral test and holds potential for high-throughput study of the effects of STN DBS in unilaterally lesioned rats.

    View details for DOI 10.1109/TNSRE.2012.2197761

    View details for Web of Science ID 000308462600002

    View details for PubMedID 22692937

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3699208