Bio

Bio


I am an ebullient family physician with special interests in medical education, adolescent medicine, mental health and preventive care. I earned my undergraduate degree in psychology at the University of Puget Sound and enjoy working with patients to explore and overcome mental and emotional challenges that may contribute to disease.

My medical training began while seated around the dinner table in rural northern California where, as a child, I was inspired by the joy that my parents experienced working as family practitioners. In pursuit of formal medical training I ventured from the west coast to Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota where I was “raised” in a culture of medicine that prioritizes the needs of patients. I strongly believe in and strive to integrate and propagate this philosophy of care.

After surviving four winters and meeting my husband, I happily returned to San Jose, California where I completed residency in Family Medicine at the San Jose-O’Connor Family Medicine Residency Program. During residency I participated in the O’Connor-Stanford “Leaders in Education” Residency Pathway (OSLER) where I began formal training in medical education, working with Stanford clinician educators and medical students. I continued this training as a fellow in the Rathmann Family Foundation Medical Education Faculty Fellowship in Patient-Centered Care in 2014.

Outside of work I am usually found spending time with my husband in our dahlia and vegetable garden, hiking or cooking. I also enjoy playing soccer, swimming and traveling throughout the world.

Clinical Focus


  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Mental health
  • Family Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director, O'Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) Pathway (2015 - Present)
  • Physician, Lucile Packard After Hours Clinic (2013 - 2015)
  • Director, IMPACT Program (2015 - Present)
  • Wellness Group Leader, San Jose-O'Connor Family Medicine Residency (2013 - Present)
  • Associate, Educators-4-Care (E4C) (2011 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Family Medicine Resident Award for Scholarship, AFMRD/NAPCRG/CFPC (2011)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Executive Committee Member, O'Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) Program (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Academy of Family Physicians (2010 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Family Medicine, American Board of Family Medicine (2013)
  • Residency:O'Connor Hospital (2013) CA
  • Medical Education:Mayo Medical School (2010) MN
  • Residency, San Jose-O'Connor Family Medicine Residency Program (2013)
  • Medical School, Mayo Clinic (2010)
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Puget Sound, Psychology (2005)

Community and International Work


  • Cardinal Free Clinics

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Describe your current research interest and activities

Publications

All Publications


  • Rethinking empathy decline: results from an OSCE. The clinical teacher Teng, V. C., Nguyen, C., Hall, K. T., Rydel, T., Sattler, A., Schillinger, E., Weinlander, E., Lin, S. 2017

    Abstract

    The phenomenon of empathy decline among medical students during training is widely accepted, with evidence based largely on studies using self-administered instruments. Recently, researchers have called into question this phenomenon, in light of new findings that suggest a discrepancy between self-administered empathy scores and observed empathic behaviours: for example, during objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). Our objective was to compare observed empathy among medical students in different clerkship years using an OSCE.Participants were medical students in their first or second year of clinical clerkships, enrolled in a required family medicine clerkship at Stanford University. Participants completed an OSCE that was directly observed by trained faculty staff, who used the Measure of Patient-Centered Communication (MPCC) instrument to measure empathic behaviours. Statistics were used to determine correlations between observed empathy and the students' year of clerkship, gender, and specialty preference.A total of 129 medical students, evenly divided by gender and clerkship year, participated. There was a possible trend towards higher MPCC scores among students in their second clerkship year compared with students in their first year (p = 0.09), which became more significant when adjusted for outlier effects (p = 0.05). There was no difference in performance by gender. Students interested in a 'people-oriented' specialty scored higher in 'handling the patient's frustration' compared with those who are interested in a 'technology-oriented' specialty.In our study, observed empathic behaviours were not lower in the second compared with the first year of clerkship training. More research is warranted to investigate the apparent discrepancy between self-administered empathy scores and observed empathic behaviours. New findings suggest a discrepancy between self-administered empathy scores and observed empathic behaviours.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/tct.12608

    View details for PubMedID 28164429

  • Creating the medical school of the future through incremental curricular transformation: the Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD). Education for primary care : an official publication of the Association of Course Organisers, National Association of GP Tutors, World Organisation of Family Doctors Lin, S., Osborn, K., Sattler, A., Nelligan, I., Svec, D., Aaronson, A., Schillinger, E. 2016: 1-5

    View details for PubMedID 27892817

  • Impact of a scholarly track on quality of residency program applicants. Education for primary care : an official publication of the Association of Course Organisers, National Association of GP Tutors, World Organisation of Family Doctors Celebi, J. M., Nguyen, C. T., Sattler, A. L., Stevens, M. B., Lin, S. Y. 2016; 27 (6): 478-481

    Abstract

    It is generally believed that residency programs offering scholarly tracks attract higher quality applicants, although there is little evidence of this in the literature. We explored the impact of a clinician-educator track on the quality of applicants to our residency program by comparing the volume and characteristics of applicants before (2008-2011) and after (2012-2015) the track was introduced.The total number of applications received was compared between the pre-track and post-track years. Among interviewees, data on United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores, Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores, Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) scores, and proportion of candidates with an advanced degree (e.g. MPH, PhD) were compared. An online survey was administered to all interviewees in 2014-2015 to measure interest in the track.The total number of applications to the residency program increased significantly from the pre-track to the post-track years. Compared to the pre-track years, interviewees during the post-track years had statistically higher USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores, better MSPE scores, and were more likely to have an advanced degree. Two-thirds of survey respondents reported that the track increased their interest in the residency program.A residency clinician-educator track may be associated with increased overall interest from applicants, higher application volume, and better measures of applicant quality based on USMLE scores, MSPE scores, and proportion of candidates with an advanced degree. Residency programs may consider a potential increase in the quality of their applicants as an added benefit of offering a scholarly track.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/14739879.2016.1197049

    View details for PubMedID 27312956

  • Training Future Clinician-Educators: A Track for Family Medicine Residents. Family medicine Lin, S., Sattler, A., Chen Yu, G., Basaviah, P., Schillinger, E. 2016; 48 (3): 212-216

    Abstract

    Despite a growing demand for skilled clinician-educators, residents today rarely receive formal training in clinical teaching, curriculum development, administration, leadership, or educational scholarship. The authors describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of the O'Connor Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) track, a novel clinician-educator track within the family medicine residency program affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine.In 2010, the OSLER track was introduced at O'Connor Hospital, a community hospital that houses an 8-8-8 family medicine residency program. Residents who are in good standing can apply to the track at the midpoint of their first postgraduate year. Residents are immersed in a flexible, experience-based, 2.5-year-long curriculum with hands-on teaching activities at its core. To foster skills in educational scholarship, track residents are required to design and complete a scholarly project.A comprehensive evaluation plan is currently in progress. Preliminary data indicates high levels of satisfaction with the track's overall value, impact on core teaching skills, and effect on career trajectory. Residents gained more confidence in core teaching skills as they progressed through the track. Scholarly work output by residents has increased significantly since the track was implemented. The residency program has seen an increased interest from applicants since the track was started, with data suggesting that applicant quality has increased from the pre-track to post-track years.More research is needed to assess the effectiveness and reproducibility of this clinician-educator track. If proven, this model may be replicated at other academic medical centers.

    View details for PubMedID 26950910

  • Training Future Clinician-Educators: A Track for Family Medicine Residents. Family medicine Lin, S., Sattler, A., Chen Yu, G., Basaviah, P., Schillinger, E. 2016; 48 (3): 212-216

    View details for PubMedID 26950910

  • Sexual Abuse and Lifetime Diagnosis of Somatic Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Mayo Clinic Proceedings Chen, L. P., et al 2010; 85 (7): 618-29
  • Sexual Abuse and Lifetime Diagnosis of Somatic Disorders A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Paras, M. L., Murad, M. H., Chen, L. P., Goranson, E. N., Sattler, A. L., Colbenson, K. M., Elamin, M. B., Seime, R. J., Prokop, L. J., Zirakzadeh, A. 2009; 302 (5): 550-561

    Abstract

    Many patients presenting for general medical care have a history of sexual abuse. The literature suggests an association between a history of sexual abuse and somatic sequelae.To systematically assess the association between sexual abuse and a lifetime diagnosis of somatic disorders. Data Sources and Extraction A systematic literature search of electronic databases from January 1980 to December 2008. Pairs of reviewers extracted descriptive, quality, and outcome data from included studies. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled across studies by using the random-effects model. The I(2) statistic was used to assess heterogeneity.Eligible studies were longitudinal (case-control and cohort) and reported somatic outcomes in persons with and without history of sexual abuse.The search identified 23 eligible studies describing 4640 subjects. There was a significant association between a history of sexual abuse and lifetime diagnosis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.36-4.31; I(2) = 82%; 5 studies), nonspecific chronic pain (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.54-3.15; 1 study), psychogenic seizures (OR, 2.96; 95% CI, 1.12-4.69, I(2) = 0%; 3 studies), and chronic pelvic pain (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.73-4.30, I(2) = 40%; 10 studies). There was no statistically significant association between sexual abuse and a lifetime diagnosis of fibromyalgia (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 0.85-3.07, I(2) = 0%; 4 studies), obesity (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 0.88-2.46; I(2) = 71%; 2 studies), or headache (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 0.96-2.31; 1 study). We found no studies that assessed syncope. When analysis was restricted to studies in which sexual abuse was defined as rape, significant associations were observed between rape and a lifetime diagnosis of fibromyalgia (OR, 3.35; 95% CI, 1.51-7.46), chronic pelvic pain (OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.02-10.53), and functional gastrointestinal disorders (OR, 4.01; 95% CI, 1.88-8.57).Evidence suggests a history of sexual abuse is associated with lifetime diagnosis of multiple somatic disorders.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000268640500019

    View details for PubMedID 19654389