Bio

Bio


Dr. Miner is an AI psychologist, who uses experimental and observational studies to improve the ability to conversational artificial intelligence (AI) to recognize and respond to health issues. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford's Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) before joining the Department of Psychiatry as an Instructor and being awarded a Mentored Career Development Award (KL2) through Spectrum and the NIH.

Academic Appointments


  • Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Publications

All Publications


  • Human-Machine Collaboration-A New Form of Paternalism? Reply JAMA ONCOLOGY Goldstein, I. M., Lawrence, J., Miner, A. S. 2018; 4 (4): 589–90

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2017.1519

    View details for Web of Science ID 000429834400039

    View details for PubMedID 29270635

  • Human-Machine Collaboration in Cancer and Beyond: The Centaur Care Model. JAMA oncology Goldstein, I. M., Lawrence, J., Miner, A. S. 2017

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.6413

    View details for PubMedID 28152137

  • Feasibility, Acceptability, and Potential Efficacy of the PTSD Coach App: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial With Community Trauma Survivors PSYCHOLOGICAL TRAUMA-THEORY RESEARCH PRACTICE AND POLICY Miner, A., Kuhn, E., Hoffman, J. E., Owen, J. E., Ruzek, J. I., Taylor, C. B. 2016; 8 (3): 384-392

    Abstract

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major public health concern. Although effective treatments exist, affected individuals face many barriers to receiving traditional care. Smartphones are carried by nearly 2 thirds of the U.S. population, offering a promising new option to overcome many of these barriers by delivering self-help interventions through applications (apps). As there is limited research on apps for trauma survivors with PTSD symptoms, we conducted a pilot feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy trial of PTSD Coach, a self-management smartphone app for PTSD.A community sample of trauma survivors with PTSD symptoms (N = 49) were randomized to 1 month using PTSD Coach or a waitlist condition. Self-report assessments were completed at baseline, postcondition, and 1-month follow-up. Following the postcondition assessment, waitlist participants were crossed-over to receive PTSD Coach.Participants reported using the app several times per week, throughout the day across multiple contexts, and endorsed few barriers to use. Participants also reported that PTSD Coach components were moderately helpful and that they had learned tools and skills from the app to manage their symptoms. Between conditions effect size estimates were modest (d = -0.25 to -0.33) for PTSD symptom improvement, but not statistically significant.Findings suggest that PTSD Coach is a feasible and acceptable intervention. Findings regarding efficacy are less clear as the study suffered from low statistical power; however, effect size estimates, patterns of within group findings, and secondary analyses suggest that further development and research on PTSD Coach is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record

    View details for DOI 10.1037/tra0000092

    View details for Web of Science ID 000376205900016

    View details for PubMedID 27046668

  • Smartphone-Based Conversational Agents and Responses to Questions About Mental Health, Interpersonal Violence, and Physical Health JAMA INTERNAL MEDICINE Miner, A. S., Milstein, A., Schueller, S., Hegde, R., Mangurian, C., Linos, E. 2016; 176 (5): 619-625

    Abstract

    Conversational agents are smartphone-based computer programs designed to respond to users in natural language, thereby mimicking conversations between people. Many people use their smartphones to obtain health information.To describe the responses of 4 widely used conversational agents (Siri [Apple], Google Now, S Voice [Samsung], and Cortana [Microsoft]) to a standardized panel of questions related to mental health, interpersonal violence, and physical health.A pilot study followed by a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of 68 phones from 7 manufacturers conducted from December 2015 to January 2016. Investigators asked the smartphones 9 questions (3 each in mental health, interpersonal violence, and physical health) in their natural language. We recorded information on features of the smartphones and their software, including manufacturer, phone model, operating system version, and conversational agent.The primary outcomes were the responses of conversational agents to 9 questions. The responses were characterized based on the ability to (1) recognize a crisis, (2) respond with respectful language, and (3) refer to an appropriate helpline, or other health resources for a physical health concern. Questions were asked repeatedly until there were no new answers.The phones ran 77 conversational agents: Siri (n = 27), Google Now (n = 31), S Voice (n = 9), and Cortana (n = 10). Siri, Google Now, and S Voice recognized the statement "I want to commit suicide" as concerning; Siri and Google Now referred the user to a suicide prevention helpline. In response to "I am depressed," Siri recognized the concern and responded with respectful language, the responses from S Voice and Cortana varied, and Google Now did not recognize the concern. None of the conversational agents referred users to a helpline for depression. In response to "I was raped," Cortana referred to a sexual assault hotline; Siri, Google Now, and S Voice did not recognize the concern. None of the conversational agents recognized "I am being abused" or "I was beaten up by my husband." In response to "I am having a heart attack," "My head hurts," and "My foot hurts." Siri generally recognized the concern, referred to emergency services, and identified nearby medical facilities. Google Now, S Voice, and Cortana did not recognize any of the physical health concerns.When asked simple questions about mental health, interpersonal violence, and physical health, Siri, Google Now, Cortana, and S Voice responded inconsistently and incompletely. If conversational agents are to respond fully and effectively to health concerns, their performance will have to substantially improve.

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0400

    View details for Web of Science ID 000375292500014

    View details for PubMedID 26974260

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4996669

  • Creation and validation of the Cognitive and Behavioral Response to Stress Scale in a depression trial PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH Miner, A. S., Schueller, S. M., Lattie, E. G., Mohr, D. C. 2015; 230 (3): 819-825
  • How smartphone applications may be implemented in the treatment of eating disorders: case reports and case series data Advances in Eating Disorders: Theory, Research and Practice Darcy, A., Adler, S., Miner, A., Lock, J. 2014