Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • President, Medical Staff (2005 - 2007)

Honors & Awards


  • Resolution Awardee, California State Legislature Assembly (1995)
  • Listee, Best Doctors in America (1996-2007)
  • Honorary Life Membership, California Society of Anesthesiologists (1995)
  • Distinguished Service Award, California Society of Anesthesiologists (2005)
  • Member, Academy of Anesthesiology (2002)
  • Fellow, American College of Cardiology (1980)

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Care management and technology enhance care delivery. Medical group management journal / MGMA Fickenscher, K. M., Garman, J. K. 1999: 30-32

    Abstract

    Many health care delivery organizations have experienced a flattening in the rate of their ability to decrease health care costs. Providers--if they are willing to take responsibility for care management and make appropriate investments to support the initiatives--are the logical party to take responsibility for improving care and cost control. Taking responsibility for care management, however, requires the tactical deployment of information technology to enhance care management. This article outlines what is required for information technology to improve care and cut costs.

    View details for PubMedID 10788080

  • Optimal pressures and flows during cardiopulmonary bypass. Pro: a low-flow, low-pressure technique is acceptable. Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia Garman, J. K. 1991; 5 (4): 399-401

    View details for PubMedID 1873520

  • USE OF A CHLORHEXIDINE DRESSING TO REDUCE MICROBIAL COLONIZATION OF EPIDURAL CATHETERS ANESTHESIOLOGY Shapiro, J. M., Bond, E. L., Garman, J. K. 1990; 73 (4): 625-631

    Abstract

    We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a chlorhexidine dressing in reducing the microbial flora at the insertion site of epidural catheters. These catheters were used for acute pain management and were dressed either by a standardized method or with a CHX/urethane sponge composite. Microbial colonization of the catheter developed in 9 of 31 controls (29.0%) and 1 of 26 (3.8%) catheters with the CHX dressing (P less than 0.05%). The CHX dressing caused no adverse effects. The data suggest that delivery of antiseptic to the catheter wound site reduces catheter colonization with a possible reduction in the risk of epidural catheter-related infection.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990EB62300007

    View details for PubMedID 2121070

  • TOO HOT TO HANDLE - A LARYNGOSCOPE MALFUNCTION ANESTHESIOLOGY Siegel, L. C., Garman, J. K. 1990; 72 (6): 1088-1089

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990DH68800022

    View details for PubMedID 2350024

  • AN ATTACHABLE SILVER-IMPREGNATED CUFF FOR PREVENTION OF INFECTION WITH CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERS - A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED MULTICENTER TRIAL AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Maki, D. G., Cobb, L., Garman, J. K., Shapiro, J. M., Ringer, M., Helgerson, R. B. 1988; 85 (3): 307-314

    Abstract

    Percutaneously inserted central venous catheters are widely used. Catheter-related bacteremia or fungemia is the most frequent serious complication of these catheters. In an attempt to reduce the frequency of such infections, a subcutaneous cuff constructed of a biodegradable collagen matrix impregnated with bactericidal silver was developed. Our goal was to assess, in a multicenter clinical trial, the effectiveness of this cuff in preventing catheter-related infection.Central venous catheters needed for fluid or drug therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, or hyperalimentation in patients in three centers were randomly assigned to be inserted with or without the cuff. Patients and catheters in the two groups were comparable in terms of risk factors predisposing to infection, including colonization of skin about the insertion site.The results with 234 catheters inserted into a new site showed that catheters inserted with the cuff were threefold less likely to be colonized on removal (more than 15 colony-forming units) than were control catheters (28.9 percent versus 9.1 percent, p = 0.002) and were nearly fourfold less likely to produce bacteremia (3.7 percent versus 1.0 percent). Adverse effects from the cuff were not seen. The cuff did not confer protection, however against infection with catheters inserted over a guidewire into old sites. Most of the catheter-related infections identified in this study, including four of the six bacteremias, appear to have been caused by microorganisms colonizing skin about the insertion site, affirming the pathogenetic basis for benefit seen with the cuff in this clinical trial; two may have derived from contamination of the catheter hub.This novel, silver-impregnated, attachable cuff can substantially reduce the incidence of catheter-related infection with most percutaneously inserted central venous catheters, can extend the time catheters can be left in place safely, and can prove cost-beneficial.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988Q014700005

    View details for PubMedID 3046351

  • ANESTHESIA FOR CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION CLEVELAND CLINIC QUARTERLY Garman, J. K. 1981; 48 (1): 142-146

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981LV01000027

    View details for PubMedID 7021000

  • ARE ANESTHESIOLOGISTS EXPERTS IN CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION ANESTHESIOLOGY Garman, J. K. 1979; 50 (3): 182-184

    View details for Web of Science ID A1979GP62000002

    View details for PubMedID 434500

  • EFFECTS OF INNOVAR ON FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY AND TOTAL CHEST COMPLIANCE IN MAN ANESTHESIOLOGY KALLOS, T., Wyche, M. Q., Garman, J. K. 1973; 39 (5): 558-561

    View details for Web of Science ID A1973R294200020

    View details for PubMedID 4746064

  • ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC PATTERN DURING ANESTHESIA WITH ETHRANE - EFFECTS OF DEPTH OF ANESTHESIA, PACO2, AND NITROUS OXIDE ANESTHESIOLOGY NEIGH, J. L., Garman, J. K., HARP, J. R. 1971; 35 (5): 482-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1971K686500005

    View details for PubMedID 5098697

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