Bio

Bio


Jennifer K. Chen, M.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology and directs the contact dermatitis clinic. She co-directs the medical student sub-internship program. She completed medical school at Johns Hopkins University, residency at Johns Hopkins and University of California, Irvine, and completed a Howard Hughes Fellowship at Stanford University. Her clinical interests include complex medical dermatology, skin cancer, inpatient dermatology, and contact dermatitis.

Clinical Focus


  • Dermatology
  • Scleroderma and Sclerodermoid Disorders
  • Contact Dermatitis
  • Psoriasis
  • Skin Cancers

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology (2013)
  • Undergraduate Degree, University of California, Berkeley, CA (2003)
  • Medical Education:Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (2009) MD
  • Fellowship, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, Dermatology (2009)
  • Internship:Johns Hopkins Bayview Hospital (2010) MD
  • Residency:University of California Irvine (2013) CA
  • Board Certification, Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology (2013)

Publications

All Publications


  • Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma. Rheumatic diseases clinics of North America Postolova, A., Chen, J. K., Chung, L. 2016; 42 (1): 103-118

    Abstract

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified by the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into 4 categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Systemic corticosteroid (CS) treatment is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extracutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS; however, high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. Although CS can be effective first-line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.rdc.2015.08.011

    View details for PubMedID 26611554