Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Dermatology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Medical Education:Weill Cornell Medical College (2014) NY
  • Board Certification: Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology (2018)
  • Residency:Stanford University Dermatology Residency (2018) CA
  • Internship:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Transitional Year Training (2015) NY
  • Bachelor of Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2009)
  • Doctor of Medicine, Cornell University (2014)

Publications

All Publications


  • Coupled Single-Cell CRISPR Screening and Epigenomic Profiling Reveals Causal Gene Regulatory Networks. Cell Rubin, A. J., Parker, K. R., Satpathy, A. T., Qi, Y., Wu, B., Ong, A. J., Mumbach, M. R., Ji, A. L., Kim, D. S., Cho, S. W., Zarnegar, B. J., Greenleaf, W. J., Chang, H. Y., Khavari, P. A. 2018

    Abstract

    Here, we present Perturb-ATAC, a method that combines multiplexed CRISPR interference or knockout with genome-wide chromatin accessibility profiling in single cells based on the simultaneous detection of CRISPR guide RNAs and open chromatin sites by assay of transposase-accessible chromatin with sequencing (ATAC-seq). We applied Perturb-ATAC to transcription factors (TFs), chromatin-modifying factors, and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in 4,300 single cells, encompassing more than 63 genotype-phenotype relationships. Perturb-ATAC in human Blymphocytes uncovered regulators of chromatin accessibility, TF occupancy, and nucleosome positioning and identified a hierarchy of TFs that govern B cell state, variation, and disease-associated cis-regulatory elements. Perturb-ATAC in primary human epidermal cells revealed three sequential modules of cis-elements that specify keratinocyte fate. Combinatorial deletion of all pairs of these TFsuncovered their epistatic relationships and highlighted genomic co-localization as a basis for synergistic interactions. Thus, Perturb-ATAC is a powerful strategy to dissect gene regulatory networks in development and disease.

    View details for PubMedID 30580963

  • Molecular Profiling in Cutaneous Melanoma. Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Ji, A. L., Bichakjian, C. K., Swetter, S. M. 2016; 14 (4): 475-480

    Abstract

    Molecular profiling of malignant tumors is gaining increasing interest in oncology. In recent years, several molecular techniques have been studied in melanoma, with the goal to improve upon the diagnostic and prognostic abilities of currently available clinical and histopathologic parameters. Reliable tests performed early in the diagnosis and management of melanoma could lead to decreased morbidity and mortality by selecting appropriate patients for more-aggressive therapy and sparing those for whom it is not indicated. This article reviews the molecular diagnostic and prognostic techniques currently available for melanoma and evaluates their potential role in clinical practice.

    View details for PubMedID 27059194

  • Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression. Nature Obenauf, A. C., Zou, Y., Ji, A. L., Vanharanta, S., Shu, W., Shi, H., Kong, X., Bosenberg, M. C., Wiesner, T., Rosen, N., Lo, R. S., Massagué, J. 2015; 520 (7547): 368–72

    Abstract

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed human and mouse melanoma and human lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The tumour-promoting secretome of melanoma cells treated with the kinase inhibitor vemurafenib is driven by downregulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of several signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and the PI(3)K/AKT/mTOR intracellular signalling pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant human melanoma, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nature14336

    View details for PubMedID 25807485

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4507807