Patient Care

  • A new study reveals social factors that increase the risk of dying from air pollution and finds stark racial disparities.

  • Lymphoma therapy shows promise

    In an early Stanford Medicine study, CAR-T cell therapy helps some with intractable lymphoma, but those who relapse have few options. Modifying the therapy’s molecular target improved response.

  • Pump for kids’ failing hearts

    A new type of surgically implanted pump that can support a child’s failing heart has passed the first stage of human testing in a Stanford Medicine-led trial.

  • Studying neurodevelopmental disorders

    Stanford Medicine research on Timothy syndrome — which predisposes newborns to autism and epilepsy — may extend well beyond the rare genetic disorder to schizophrenia and other conditions.

  • AI models help clinician communication

    A new artificial intelligence model helps physicians and nurses work together at Stanford Hospital to boost patient care.

  • Virtual biopsy shows promise

    Stanford Medicine researchers develop a new imaging method to create a cell-by-cell reconstruction of skin or other tissue without taking a biopsy.

  • AI tools take on soft tissue sarcomas

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare and difficult to treat. Machine-learning tools designed at Stanford Medicine uncover distinct cellular communities that correlate with prognosis, immunotherapy success.

  • $1 billion community investment

    Stanford Medicine invested $1.07 billion in funds and services during the 2023 fiscal year to bolster Bay Area communities.

  • AI helps with patient emails

    Stanford Medicine study shows that large language models can lend a hand to clinicians in responding to patient email messages.

  • AI helps with clinical notes

    Stanford Medicine integrates AI-powered listening technology that takes notes for health care providers, allowing them to spend more time with patients and less time on administrative tasks.

  • Who needs regular COVID-19 boosters?

    A study led by researchers at Stanford Medicine finds the benefit of frequent booster vaccination for COVID-19 is highest for those over 65 years and the immunocompromised.

  • Augmented reality in the OR

    Stanford Medicine physician uses augmented reality to streamline data visualization during surgery.


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