Preventive Medicine

  • Stanford Medicine researchers find that using in vitro fertilization with testing embryos for inherited diseases would significantly reduce costs.

  • Personalized PSA improves cancer screening

    The solution to the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could lie in every man’s genome. Stanford Medicine researchers take a step toward genetically personalized cancer screening.

  • Screening for chronic kidney disease

    Many people don’t know they have chronic kidney disease until it progresses. A new study by Stanford Medicine researchers finds that screening would increase life expectancy in a cost-effective way.

  • How statins improve vascular health

    Statins designed to lower cholesterol have long been noted to work in mysterious ways to improve other aspects of cardiovascular health. A Stanford Medicine-led study uncovers how they do it.

  • Osteoarthritis linked to allergic inflammation

    A connection found between asthma, eczema and osteoarthritis indicates that drugs to treat allergic conditions could be used in future studies aimed at slowing the progression of osteoarthritis.

  • Hemorrhage toolkit is cost-effective

    A statewide quality-improvement project to treat excessive bleeding during childbirth averts $9 million annually in California’s health care costs, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • What to know about mpox

    The mpox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • ‘Digital human’ helps reduce knee stress

    A computer simulation that relates muscle activation patterns to harmful pressure on the knee helps participants adopt knee-protective strategies as they walk.

  • Vaccines bolster immunity from prior infection

    Two-dose COVID-19 vaccines significantly increase protection against hospitalization and death in people who had the illness before they were immunized.

  • Test can predict severe dengue

    Researchers have created a test that can predict which dengue patients will likely have mild symptoms and which should be clinically monitored for a high risk of severe illness.

  • Transfusion boosts brain function

    In a Stanford study, sedentary mice appear to benefit from another same-aged mouse’s exercise — if they receive injections of its blood.

  • Study: COVID-19 vaccine effective in cancer patients

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines prevented COVID-19 infection in cancer patients, particularly in those whose treatment concluded more than six months before vaccination, say researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the VA.


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