Neuroscience

  • The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about developments in neuroscience and treatments for conditions affecting the brain and nervous system.

  • Michelle Monje awarded 'genius grant'

    The neuroscientist and pediatric neuro-oncologist is being recognized for her work to understand healthy brain development and create therapies for a group of lethal brain tumors.

  • Stroke center fills critical care need

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's stroke program is recognized for its commitment to meeting rigorous national standards of stroke care.

  • Karl Deisseroth wins Lasker award

    Discoveries by Deisseroth and his two co-recipients regarding microbial light-activated molecules led to his development of a way to manipulate selected neurons in living animals to observe changes in their behavior.

  • Insulin resistance increases depression risk

    About 1 in 3 American adults has insulin resistance, a silent time bomb that doubles their risk for serious depression, Stanford scientists have learned.

  • With gift, Alzheimer’s center renamed

    In addition to supporting the nationally recognized research center, the Good Planet Foundation has endowed a professorship in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

  • Once-nightly narcolepsy drug is effective

    A phase 3 study has found that an extended-release version of sodium oxybate reduces daytime sleepiness and attacks of muscle weakness in narcolepsy patients.

  • A new view of memory’s building blocks

    Stanford neuroscientists find that initial memory formation may involve both awareness of our location as well as what we were feeling when we were there.

  • Endocannabinoids and epilepsy

    Release of the brain’s equivalent of THC, marijuana’s active component, reduces seizure activity but leads to post-seizure oxygen deprivation in the brain, Stanford scientists and their collaborators have shown.

  • Schulman on value of new Alzheimer’s drug

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new and expensive medication for Alzheimer’s disease, but it’s not clear it helps. Researcher Kevin Schulman discusses what the government should consider before deciding to cover it.

  • Evidence COVID-19 causes brain inflammation

    A detailed molecular analysis of tissue from the brains of individuals who died of COVID-19 reveals extensive signs of inflammation and neurodegeneration, but no sign of the virus that causes the disease.

  • Software ‘reads’ imagined handwriting

    Artificial intelligence, interpreting data from a device placed at the brain’s surface, enables people who are paralyzed or have severely impaired limb movement to communicate by text.


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