list : Women's Health

  • Breast cancer mutations don’t lower survival rates

    Newly diagnosed breast or ovarian cancer patients who carry common cancer-associated mutations have similar or better short-term survival rates than those with no mutations, researchers report.

  • Robot aids cancer surgery

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare physician performs surgery on a cancer patient with the help of a da Vinci robotic system. The technology eases patients’ recovery and offers surgeons a clear view of the procedure.

  • Blood biomarkers predict labor onset

    About three weeks before delivery, a pregnant woman’s body shifts into a pre-labor phase characterized by changes in immune, hormonal and blood-clotting signals.

  • High nitrate levels in water linked to preterm birth

    Women exposed to higher levels of nitrate in drinking water were more likely to deliver very early, according to a study of 1.4 million California births.

  • Fewer C-sections for California moms

    A statewide quality improvement project has reduced cesarean section rates for low-risk, first-time mothers, while also improving outcomes for babies.

  • Epidurals not linked to autism risk

    Refuting an earlier study, researchers found that epidural anesthesia, commonly administered for pain relief during labor, does not increase the risk for autism in children.

  • SHC – ValleyCare rakes in honors

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare was recognized for overall quality, safety and performance in a number of specialties.

  • Investigating preeclampsia, heart disease

    Stanford researchers will study the connections between preeclampsia in pregnant women and the subsequent risk of atherosclerosis as the women grow older.

  • IUD device aids contraception in India

    Stanford researchers and their colleagues have tested a new contraceptive device that they say could provide broader access to long-acting contraception in developing countries.

  • More premature births after recent deployment

    Giving birth soon after military deployment is linked to greater risk of premature delivery, a Stanford study of U.S. servicewomen found, but deployment history itself does not raise prematurity risk.