list : Stem Cells

  • $31 million for stem cell clinical trials

    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has awarded $31 million to three Stanford researchers to launch trials of treatments for common diseases. Four other Stanford researchers also received a total of $4.55 million.

  • Old skeletal stem cells hinder healing

    Researchers have found that old skeletal stem cells contribute to bone fragility and poor healing in mice, but that a stem cell-boosting gel may help restore function.

  • Drug enables scarless healing

    Researchers have identified the mechanisms of scar formation in skin and demonstrated in mice a way to make wounds heal with normal skin instead of scar tissue.

  • Molecule restores strength in old mice

    A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a Stanford study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans.

  • Method to regrow cartilage

    In laboratory studies, Stanford School of Medicine researchers have found a way to regenerate the cartilage that eases movement between bones.

  • How pathogens put the brakes on immune response

    Researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine have discovered that cells infected by viruses or bacteria send out a “don’t eat me” signal to avoid attack by the body’s immune system.

  • Potential treatment for lung fibrosis

    New research suggests that lung fibrosis develops when scar tissue cells escape immune surveillance, suggesting potential therapy.

  • Roeland Nusse receives Gairdner award

    The Stanford developmental biologist was honored for a lifetime of work on the Wnt signaling pathway, which plays an important role in normal development and in cancer.

  • Old human cells rejuvenated

    Old human cells can become more youthful by coaxing them to briefly express proteins used to make induced pluripotent cells, Stanford researchers and their colleagues have found. The finding may have implications for aging research.

  • Single number IDs deadly cancer cells

    Stanford data scientists have shown that figuring out a single number can help them find the most dangerous cancer cells.