list : Stem Cells

  • Step toward growing organs

    Researchers have shown initial viability of an embryo that contains both chimpanzee and macaque cells in a preliminary study that explores the feasibility of primate organ genesis.

  • Ketogenic diet helps cells survive stress

    Muscle stem cells enter a deep resting state during fasting or when fed a high-fat ketogenic diet, a Stanford-led study finds. This promotes stem cell resilience but slows injury repair.

  • Electric current aids stroke recovery

    Stanford scientists have developed a device that delivers and electrically stimulates stem cells to promote stroke healing.

  • $12 million for stem cell trial

    Stanford researcher Maria Grazia Roncarolo has been awarded $12 million by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for a trial aimed at improving the outcomes of stem cell transplants in children and young adults with blood cancers.

  • $31 million for stem cell clinical trials

    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has awarded $31 million to three Stanford researchers to launch trials of treatments for common diseases. Four other Stanford researchers also received a total of $4.55 million.

  • Old skeletal stem cells hinder healing

    Researchers have found that old skeletal stem cells contribute to bone fragility and poor healing in mice, but that a stem cell-boosting gel may help restore function.

  • Drug enables scarless healing

    Researchers have identified the mechanism of scar formation in skin and demonstrated in mice a way to make wounds heal with normal skin instead of scar tissue.

  • Molecule restores strength in old mice

    A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a Stanford study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans.

  • Method to regrow cartilage

    In laboratory studies, Stanford School of Medicine researchers have found a way to regenerate the cartilage that eases movement between bones.

  • How pathogens put the brakes on immune response

    Researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine have discovered that cells infected by viruses or bacteria send out a “don’t eat me” signal to avoid attack by the body’s immune system.