list : Precision Health

  • Statins could treat ulcerative colitis

    People with ulcerative colitis who are also taking statins have about a 50% decreased risk of colectomies and hospitalization, according to a Stanford Medicine study.

  • Data consult helps in diagnosis, treatment

    Stanford Medicine researchers created a new type of medical consult that harnesses millions of electronic health records to bring new insights to patient care.

  • Study reveals immune therapy’s challenge

    CAR-T cell therapy works for many types of blood cancers, but more than half of patients relapse. A Stanford study provides a clue as to why.

  • Wearables predict blood test results

    Stanford researchers found that data from smartwatches can flag early signs of some health conditions and predict the results of simple blood tests.

  • Blood biomarkers predict labor onset

    About three weeks before delivery, a pregnant woman’s body shifts into a pre-labor phase characterized by changes in immune, hormonal and blood-clotting signals.

  • Using population data to prevent disease in individuals

    In a virtual chat, the School of Medicine’s dean and the chair of epidemiology and population health discussed how the seemingly distinct fields can intersect to boost health equity.

  • Digital health tools aid in weight loss

    Digital health tools, such as diet-tracking apps, increase engagement in weight loss programs, helping users shed pounds, according to a new study.

  • Study reveals molecular effects of exercise

    Researchers at the School of Medicine have shown how exercise changes the body at a molecular level and have identified blood markers of fitness.

  • Wearable devices for predicting illness?

    Researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators aim to predict the onset of viral infection through data provided by wearable technology. What they need now are participants.

  • Smart toilet can flag disease

    A disease-detecting “precision health” toilet can sense multiple signs of illness through automated urine and stool analysis, a new Stanford study reports.