list : Health Policy

  • New Department of Health Policy

    Stanford School of Medicine’s new health policy department will be a hub for research and education on the causes of and solutions to health inequities.

  • How misinformation fuels vaccine hesitancy

    More than two dozen experts discussed how to combat misinformation about COVID-19 and the vaccines at a virtual conference held Aug. 26.

  • Preparing for the next pandemic

    The Stanford School of Medicine and Stanford Graduate School of Business will convene experts in health care, business and government to discuss the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, lessons for recovery and how to prepare for future health threats.

  • Wildfires and school ventilation

    With the COVID-19 pandemic and the growth of wildfires, California schools need to improve their air quality, according to Stanford pediatrician Lisa Patel. Fortunately, the funds are available.

  • Schulman on value of new Alzheimer’s drug

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new and expensive medication for Alzheimer’s disease, but it’s not clear it helps. Researcher Kevin Schulman discusses what the government should consider before deciding to cover it.

  • Winslow leads national COVID-19 group

    A professor of medicine and former Air Force colonel, Winslow temporarily relocated to Washington to head an interagency group responding to this pandemic and preparing for the next one.

  • Cost of gun injuries to minors

    The average cost of initial hospitalization to treat pediatric gun injuries is about $13,000 per patient and has risen in recent decades, a Stanford Medicine study found.

  • Evaluating papers through patents

    By tracking which scientific papers are cited by patents, researchers can quantify which studies contribute to real-world applications.

  • Promote vaccination, not herd immunity

    Epidemiology expert Julie Parsonnet warns that COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy has probably made herd immunity unattainable, which makes vaccination all the more important for personal health.

  • California’s Latinos hit hard by pandemic

    Members of the state’s largest ethnic group have faced greater exposure to COVID-19 and have contracted and died from the coronavirus at higher rates than non-Hispanic whites, a Stanford-led study finds.