list : Infectious Disease

  • J&J produces low antibody response

    In large study of dialysis patients, low immune response to the COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson indicates that a booster shot might be needed.

  • At Pandemic Puzzle symposium, a story of two pandemics

    Leaders and experts from government, academia, health care and business critiqued the U.S. and global response to the pandemic and assessed its lasting impact on the first day of “The Pandemic Puzzle: Lessons from COVID-19.”…

  • When can you vaccinate your kids?

    Stanford pediatricians helped conduct clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines for children. Data from the study will be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for consideration.

  • Study: Surgical masks reduce COVID-19 spread

    Researchers found that surgical masks impede the spread of COVID-19 and that just a few, low-cost interventions increase mask-wearing compliance.

  • Preparing for the next pandemic

    The Stanford School of Medicine and Stanford Graduate School of Business will convene experts in health care, business and government to discuss the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, lessons for recovery and how to prepare for future health threats.

  • Stanford opens long COVID clinic

    With research showing up to 30% of COVID-19 patients experiencing lingering symptoms, Stanford Health Care treats such “long haulers” with multidisciplinary teams.

  • Winslow leads national COVID-19 group

    A professor of medicine and former Air Force colonel, Winslow temporarily relocated to Washington to head an interagency group responding to this pandemic and preparing for the next one.

  • Study shows why second vaccine dose effective

    Scientists scrutinized Pfizer vaccine recipients’ blood samples to learn exactly what effects the vaccine exerts on the body’s immune system.

  • COVID-19 vaccines prevent infection

    A Stanford study finds that the mRNA vaccines, Pfizer and Moderna, offer strong protection against the California variant of the coronavirus.

  • Broad-spectrum vaccine may be possible

    An immune system stimulant called AS03 could help vaccines protect against multiple viruses by altering the epigenome of the innate immune system.