list : Genetics

  • Sex differences in genes of mice brains

    Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Fastest genome sequencing

    A research effort led by Stanford scientists set the first Guinness World Record for the fastest DNA sequencing technique, which was used to sequence a human genome in just 5 hours and 2 minutes.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Pathology faculty net four NIH grants

    Efforts to design a hepatitis C vaccine, understand the genetic causes of rare diseases, map genetic regulatory elements in organ systems and understand coronavirus immune responses garner over $40 million.

  • Grants for genome research

    Five Stanford researchers will participate in a $180 million nationwide campaign by the National Institutes of Health to understand the effect of human-genome variations on health and disease.

  • Common genetic profile linked to drug reaction

    New medications help many people with inflammatory conditions and may ease severe COVID-19, but they carry risks.

  • Statins could treat ulcerative colitis

    People with ulcerative colitis who are also taking statins have about a 50% decreased risk of colectomies and hospitalization, according to a Stanford Medicine study.

  • Genetics of cat color patterns

    Researchers discovered some of the genetics behind cat coloring, from Abyssinians and tabbies to leopards and tigers.

  • Cryptography can preserve genetic privacy

    Crime scene DNA analysis can help identify perpetrators, but current methods may divulge the genetic information of innocent people. Cryptography can protect genetic privacy without hampering law enforcement, Stanford researchers say.