list : Genetics

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • Anne Brunet wins Lurie Prize

    Anne Brunet was awarded the 2022 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences for her efforts to understand the mechanism of aging.

  • Gene-therapy gel shows promise for skin disease

    Stanford researchers have been working on gene therapies for epidermolysis bullosa, or “butterfly disease,” for over a decade. A new gel helped wounds heal and stay healed in a clinical trial.

  • Gene behind ALS hallmark discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers have linked a specific gene known to be associated with ALS with a characteristic of the disease, opening avenues for a targeted therapy.

  • Sex differences in genes of mice brains

    Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Fastest genome sequencing

    A research effort led by Stanford scientists set the first Guinness World Record for the fastest DNA sequencing technique, which was used to sequence a human genome in just 5 hours and 2 minutes.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Pathology faculty net four NIH grants

    Efforts to design a hepatitis C vaccine, understand the genetic causes of rare diseases, map genetic regulatory elements in organ systems and understand coronavirus immune responses garner over $40 million.

  • Grants for genome research

    Five Stanford researchers will participate in a $180 million nationwide campaign by the National Institutes of Health to understand the effect of human-genome variations on health and disease.