list : Genetics

  • Fish study rebuts anti-evolution argument

    A key developmental gene governs the number and length of spines in the stickleback, Stanford Medicine researchers find. The discovery supports the concept of progressive evolution in nature.

  • Step toward growing organs

    Researchers have shown initial viability of an embryo that contains both chimpanzee and macaque cells in a preliminary study that explores the feasibility of primate organ genesis.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • Anne Brunet wins Lurie Prize

    Anne Brunet was awarded the 2022 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences for her efforts to understand the mechanism of aging.

  • Gene-therapy gel shows promise for skin disease

    Stanford researchers have been working on gene therapies for epidermolysis bullosa, or “butterfly disease,” for over a decade. A new gel helped wounds heal and stay healed in a clinical trial.

  • Gene behind ALS hallmark discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers have linked a specific gene known to be associated with ALS with a characteristic of the disease, opening avenues for a targeted therapy.

  • Sex differences in genes of mice brains

    Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Fastest genome sequencing

    A research effort led by Stanford scientists set the first Guinness World Record for the fastest DNA sequencing technique, which was used to sequence a human genome in just 5 hours and 2 minutes.