list : Cardiovascular Health

  • Parents’ PTSD after child’s medical trauma

    Nearly half of parents with a child who received an implantable device to correct abnormal heart rhythms met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Joseph Wu to be AHA president

    Beginning July 2023, Wu will lead the nation’s largest nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing cardiovascular health.

  • Improving clinical trial diversity

    The American Heart Association has provided funding to two Stanford Medicine professors to develop ways to diversify enrollment in heart disease clinical trials.

  • Marijuana can damage heart

    Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects.

  • Stanford ranks high for complex heart procedures

    For patients like Nathan Foss, Stanford’s expertise in rare and complicated heart surgeries provides better options.

  • 500th heart transplant at Stanford

    Mackenzie Collins was the 500th pediatric patient to undergo a heart transplant at Stanford Medicine.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Bypass surgery vs. stenting

    Among heart-disease patients in a study who received stents, the incidence of a major complication — death, heart attack, stroke or the need for a repeat procedure — was 10.6% after a year. Among bypass patients, the rate was 6.9%.

  • Surgery for hard-to-treat atrial fibrillation

    Silas Richardson was in the hospital with a heart rhythm disorder that his doctors couldn’t get under control. Surgery at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare solved the problem.

  • Inflammatory-aging ‘clock’ predicts health

    Scientists at Stanford and the Buck Institute have found a way to predict an individual’s immunological decline as well as the likelihood of incurring age-associated diseases and becoming frail.