list : Cardiovascular Health

  • Surgery for hard-to-treat atrial fibrillation

    Silas Richardson was in the hospital with a heart rhythm disorder that his doctors couldn’t get under control. Surgery at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare solved the problem.

  • Inflammatory-aging “clock” predicts health

    Scientists at Stanford and the Buck Institute have found a way to predict an individual’s immunological decline as well as the likelihood of incurring age-associated diseases and becoming frail.

  • Recognition for mitral valve repair

    Mia Cadua underwent surgery for mitral valve repair at Stanford Health Care, which was recently recognized for its excellent record with the procedure.

  • Cardiologist William Hancock dies at 93

    During his long career at Stanford and into retirement, Hancock advanced techniques used to interpret electrocardiograms, recordings of the heart’s electrical signals.

  • 5 Questions: Hannah Valantine on diversity

    After six years at the National Institutes of Health, cardiologist Hannah Valantine has returned to Stanford Medicine with new ideas for building a more diverse and inclusive campus.

  • Coronavirus likely first infects upper airway cells

    A Stanford Medicine study reports that the coronavirus likely first infects upper airway cells and that hypertension drugs probably don't increase the risk of infection.

  • New members of National Academy of Medicine

    Laurence Baker, Jeffrey Goldberg, Steven Goodman, Fei-Fei Li and Hannah Valantine are among the 90 regular members and 10 international members elected this year to the National Academy of Medicine.

  • Possible cure for iron-overload disease

    Motivated by the loss of a patient, a doctor leads a research effort to uncover the molecular mechanisms of hemochromatosis in the heart.

  • SHC – ValleyCare rakes in honors

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare was recognized for overall quality, safety and performance in a number of specialties.

  • Plant based meat versus animal meat

    A diet that includes an average of two servings of plant-based meat alternatives lowers some cardiovascular risk factors compared with a diet that instead includes the same amount of animal meat, Stanford Medicine scientists found.