list : Cancer

  • Breast cancer mutations don’t lower survival rates

    Newly diagnosed breast or ovarian cancer patients who carry common cancer-associated mutations have similar or better short-term survival rates than those with no mutations, researchers report.

  • Neurosurgeon gives teen his life back

    After years of practicing surgery techniques in a part of the brain known as a “no man’s land,” Juan Fernandez-Miranda was able to remove a complex pituitary gland tumor from a Lebanese teenager.

  • Robot aids cancer surgery

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare physician performs surgery on a cancer patient with the help of a da Vinci robotic system. The technology eases patients’ recovery and offers surgeons a clear view of the procedure.

  • Study reveals immune therapy’s challenge

    CAR-T cell therapy works for many types of blood cancers, but more than half of patients relapse. A Stanford study provides a clue as to why.

  • Major award for childhood cancer research

    The team, composed of researchers at nine academic institutions, has published more than 100 papers and treated nearly 1,000 children with cancer in early-phase clinical trials.

  • Cancer diagnoses increase at 65, study finds

    Analyzing a national cancer database, researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

  • Stanford Medicine, Sutter Health to provide cancer care in East Bay

    The collaboration between Stanford Medicine and Sutter Health will expand access and equity to high-quality cancer care for East Bay patients, and includes future construction of a new outpatient cancer center.

  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir dies at 57

    The professor and chair of radiology at Stanford was a global leader in advancing techniques for molecular imaging and early cancer detection.

  • Cancer experience drives scientific curiosity

    New Stanford graduate Nico Poux, a former pediatric oncology patient at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, hopes to bring his experience with cancer to future work as a physician-scientist.

  • Subset of cells drive cancer growth

    Specialized cells at the leading edge of growing skin cancers dampen immune response and promote cancer invasion, Stanford researchers find. Targeting these cells could lead to effective therapies.