list : Cancer

  • Immune cells become cancer killers

    Neutrophils often suppress the immune system’s response to cancer, but when activated, they eliminate several types of tumors in laboratory mice, a study led by Stanford Medicine has found.

  • Stanford and Invus collaborate

    The collaboration will enable the development of medications to treat a type of brain cancer.

  • Shoshana Levy dies

    Shoshana Levy discovered a family of molecules called tetraspanins, launching a new field of cancer research. She was an active researcher, collaborator and mentor at Stanford Medicine for nearly three decades.

  • Possible new way to kill cancer cells

    After finding long, repetitive sequences in the genomes of seven kinds of cancer, researchers at Stanford Medicine and their colleagues developed a molecule that curbed their production.

  • Hepatitis C treatment low

    Antiviral medicine eliminates hepatitis C in 97% of patients, but Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues find that many don’t receive the treatment.

  • New National Academy of Medicine members

    Grace Lee, Crystal Mackall, Paul Mischel, Kari Nadeau, Anthony Oro and Krishna Shenoy are among the 100 members elected this year to the National Academy of Medicine.

  • Improving end-of-life care for kids

    Research into medical decisions for children with terminal illnesses can be improved by sensitively tapping the expertise of families who have lost a child, according to Stanford Medicine experts.

  • Bertozzi research advances medicine

    Bertozzi’s chemistry expertise advances research into cancer immunotherapies, tumor biology and COVID-19.

  • Hodgkin lymphoma pioneer Rosenberg dies

    Rosenberg combined radiation and chemotherapy to treat Hodgkin lymphoma, revolutionizing cancer care. He taught at Stanford Medicine for more than 50 years.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.