list : Cancer

  • Cancer disparities in Pacific Islanders

    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders experience poorer breast cancer survival outcomes that are hidden when their data is included in Asian populations, Stanford researcher says.

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.

  • New therapies for rare blood cancer

    Hematologist Jason Gotlib wanted more effective treatments for patients with systemic mastocytosis. His research has led to the approval of two new treatments by the Food and Drug Administration.

  • Key molecule’s structure found at last

    The structure of a critical cellular-signaling molecule has finally been discovered by Stanford researchers. The finding may lead to new therapies.

  • Cancer drugs might be used to treat TB

    Tuberculosis lesions in the lungs have high levels of proteins that suppress the immune system. Cancer drugs that target these proteins could be used to fight the bacterial infection.

  • Cancer drug renders COVID vaccine ineffective

    Rituximab, a drug widely used in patients with lymphoma, blunts or eliminates the antibody response to COVID-19 vaccines if it is administered before them, Stanford researchers say.

  • Antibody synergy targets tough cancers

    Two anti-cancer antibodies have a much stronger effect against pediatric nerve-cell and bone cancers in mice than either one alone, researchers have discovered.

  • Major grant renewal for Stanford Cancer Institute

    The Stanford Cancer Institute is one of 51 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers, which must meet rigorous standards for improving the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  • Hematologist Steven Coutre dies

    Steven Coutre was known for his research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his humility and his love of traveling and family.

  • Study: COVID-19 vaccine effective in cancer patients

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines prevented COVID-19 infection in cancer patients, particularly in those whose treatment concluded more than six months before vaccination, say researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the VA.