list : Cancer

  • Identifying new types of cancer cells

    EcoTyper is an algorithm that can sort out cell “ecotypes” — distinct multicellular communities — that exist in many different kinds of cancer.

  • Breast cancer mutations don’t lower survival rates

    Newly diagnosed breast or ovarian cancer patients who carry common cancer-associated mutations have similar or better short-term survival rates than those with no mutations, researchers report.

  • Neurosurgeon gives teen his life back

    After years of practicing surgery techniques in a part of the brain known as a “no man’s land,” Juan Fernandez-Miranda was able to remove a complex pituitary gland tumor from a Lebanese teenager.

  • Robot aids cancer surgery

    Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare physician performs surgery on a cancer patient with the help of a da Vinci robotic system. The technology eases patients’ recovery and offers surgeons a clear view of the procedure.

  • Study reveals immune therapy’s challenge

    CAR-T cell therapy works for many types of blood cancers, but more than half of patients relapse. A Stanford study provides a clue as to why.

  • Major award for childhood cancer research

    The team, composed of researchers at nine academic institutions, has published more than 100 papers and treated nearly 1,000 children with cancer in early-phase clinical trials.

  • Cancer diagnoses increase at 65, study finds

    Analyzing a national cancer database, researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

  • Stanford Medicine, Sutter Health to provide cancer care in East Bay

    The collaboration between Stanford Medicine and Sutter Health will expand access and equity to high-quality cancer care for East Bay patients, and includes future construction of a new outpatient cancer center.

  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir dies at 57

    The professor and chair of radiology at Stanford was a global leader in advancing techniques for molecular imaging and early cancer detection.

  • Cancer experience drives scientific curiosity

    New Stanford graduate Nico Poux, a former pediatric oncology patient at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, hopes to bring his experience with cancer to future work as a physician-scientist.