Chronic Disease

  • Antivirals may benefit some inpatients

    Elevated virus levels in hospitalized COVID-19 patients’ blood predicts worsening respiratory symptoms and suggests ongoing viral replication in later disease stages, Stanford Medicine-led study says.

  • Blood sugar control helps teens’ brains

    Diabetes treatment technology improved teenagers’ blood sugar levels and benefited their brain structure and function, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Keto and Mediterranean good for diabetes

    In a trial of the two low-carb diets, both were similarly effective in controlling blood glucose. Keto’s more severe carb restrictions did not provide additional overall health benefits.

  • Possible treatment for mucus-induced lung diseases

    Stanford Medicine investigators and their collaborators have designed a compound that’s uniquely capable of blocking excessive mucus secretion — a hallmark of several serious respiratory disorders.

  • Ami Bhatt on gut microbiomes

    The Stanford Medicine professor on why it’s important to better understand the microbiome of people transitioning from traditional to Westernized lifestyles.

  • COVID-19 hospitalizations among kids likely overcounted

    Children being treated in hospitals are tested for SARS-CoV-2, but many who test positive never develop COVID-19 symptoms, leading to overestimates of disease severity, a study found.

  • Half-million COVID-19 tests at Stanford Medicine

    Stanford Medicine, one of the first medical centers in the country to conduct clinical tests for COVID-19, has remained at the cutting edge of coronavirus detection.

  • Study of COVID-19 saliva test

    An at-home COVID-19 test, designed by Stanford researchers to be easy to use and provide results within 30 minutes, will be the focus of a study funded by the Stanford Medicine Catalyst Program.

  • Biomarker for lipedema discovered

    Researchers have identified a molecule that ties lipedema to other lymphatic diseases, such as lymphedema, and distinguishes it from obesity.

  • New center for rare eye disease

    A $10 million gift has enabled the launch of a center focusing on optic disc drusen, a poorly understood eye disease that can lead to visual impairment or even blindness.

  • Microbial loss, ulcerative colitis linked

    Bacteria normally inhabiting healthy people’s intestines — and the anti-inflammatory metabolites these bacteria produce — are depleted in ulcerative colitis patients, a Stanford study shows.