Cancer

  • Physicians, researchers and other pacesetters describe some of the most promising pursuits in the medical field. In cancer, for instance: ‘Let’s kill the first cell, not the last cell.’…

  • Real-time targeting of tumors

    New technology combines radiotherapy with real-time detection of cancer cells to target moving tumors or multiple metastases. Stanford Medicine is the first to research the technology in the clinic.

  • AI could inform brain cancer prognosis

    Stanford Medicine scientists and colleagues create an algorithm that could help physicians better understand and target complicated brain tumors.

  • Tumor suppressor repairs tissue

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been in the limelight for decades. But its cancer-fighting function may be only a side effect of its role in tissue repair, a Stanford Medicine study finds.

  • Cancer center renovation

    The Laurie K. Lacob Pavilion at the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center opened July 17. The state-of-the-art facility, for transplant and cellular therapies, is a light-filled space for healing.

  • Predictable mutations chart cancer’s path

    Human cells evolving in the laboratory undergo a series of predictable, sequential genetic changes that lead to pre-cancer. Blocking these changes may allow intervention before cancer occurs.

  • VA, Stanford Medicine cancer collab

    An anticipated growth in veterans seeking cancer care catalyzes talks to develop state-of-the-art collaboration between VA and Stanford Medicine.

  • Extra income and cancer risk factors

    Cancer disproportionately impacts persistently impoverished communities. A federal grant unites Stanford Medicine, UC Davis and UCSF to study income supplementation and cancer risk factors.

  • IMA, Intonation to collaborate

    The goal of the collaboration is to rapidly improve care for patients with tumors that form from hormone-releasing cells.

  • Few receive genetic tests for cancer

    A new study finds surprisingly low genetic testing rates for cancer patients who may benefit, especially among Asian, Black and Hispanic patients.

  • Personalized PSA improves cancer screening

    The solution to the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could lie in every man’s genome. Stanford Medicine researchers take a step toward genetically personalized cancer screening.

  • Genes linked to brain cancer

    An international effort led by a Stanford Medicine researcher finds more than 50 genes linked to glioma — a rare brain cancer. Although most gliomas are sporadic, a minority are inherited.


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