Cancer

  • A personal tragedy spurred Hahn, who had escaped Nazi Europe as a child, to pursue a career seeking new therapies for cancer.

  • Cell-based therapy for solid tumors

    The FDA recently approved the first cell-based therapy — widely used in treating blood cancers — for solid tumors. Stanford Medicine treated the first patient with advanced melanoma.

  • AI advice helps skin cancer diagnoses

    Artificial intelligence algorithms powered by deep learning improve skin cancer diagnostic accuracy for doctors, nurse practitioners and medical students in a study led by the Stanford Center for Digital Health.

  • Virtual biopsy shows promise

    Stanford Medicine researchers develop a new imaging method to create a cell-by-cell reconstruction of skin or other tissue without taking a biopsy.

  • AI tools take on soft tissue sarcomas

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare and difficult to treat. Machine-learning tools designed at Stanford Medicine uncover distinct cellular communities that correlate with prognosis, immunotherapy success.

  • New guidelines suggested for liver cancer

    A Stanford Medicine study identifies an easily measured biophysical property that can identify Type 2 diabetics at increased risk for liver cancer who don’t meet current screening guidelines.

  • Screening, treatment halve breast cancer deaths

    Treatment of metastatic disease is responsible for nearly one-third of the decrease in annual deaths from breast cancer from 1975 to 2019, according to a Stanford Medicine-led study.

  • Tumor DNA levels in blood predict outcome

    Circulating tumor DNA predicts recurrence and splits disease into two subgroups in Stanford Medicine-led study of Hodgkin lymphoma. New drug targets or changes in treatments may reduce toxicity.

  • Scar tissue predicts lifespan

    Pancreatic cancer is deadly, and its toll is growing. Scientists find that scar tissue around the tumor suggests how long a patient will live after diagnosis.

  • Cancer neuroscience discoveries give hope

    To drive their growth, many tumors hijack nervous system signals, including those needed for brain plasticity. Stanford Medicine discoveries are opening a promising new branch of oncology research.

  • African Americans less likely to be screened

    National guidelines for lung cancer screening are less effective for African Americans than for whites, Stanford study concludes. A risk-based analysis is more equitable and effective.

  • Lung cancer cells protected by brain cells

    Small cell lung cancers often metastasize to the brain. A Stanford Medicine study shows they thrive there by emulating developing neurons and recruiting surrounding cells for protection.


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