Administration

  • Mackenzie Collins was the 500th pediatric patient to undergo a heart transplant at Stanford Medicine.

  • Grant for faculty family care

    The Doris Duke foundation has awarded the Stanford School of Medicine $550,000 to aid physician-scientists with family caregiving responsibilities heightened by COVID-19.

  • Transfusion boosts brain function

    In a Stanford study, sedentary mice appear to benefit from another same-aged mouse’s exercise — if they receive injections of its blood.

  • Surgery rates rebounded quickly in pandemic

    After a dramatic drop in nonessential surgery rates early in the pandemic, U.S. hospitals quickly adapted to new safety protocols, and rates returned to normal, Stanford Medicine research shows.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Stanford Health Care named top hospital

    Leapfrog Group, a national leader in rating the quality of U.S. hospitals, has named Stanford Health Care a top academic medical center.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.

  • Study: COVID-19 vaccine effective in cancer patients

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines prevented COVID-19 infection in cancer patients, particularly in those whose treatment concluded more than six months before vaccination, say researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the VA.

  • Piecemeal e-cigarette policies bad for youth

    Flavored disposable e-cigarettes attractive to young users proliferated after the most recent round of FDA policy announcements, negating the policies’ intended effects, a Stanford study found.

  • Smartwatch stress alerts

    Stanford Medicine researchers created an algorithm to notify smartwatch wearers of stress, capturing events such as air travel, extended exercise and illness.

  • Experts: Pandemic sparked key innovations

    In the final installment of The Pandemic Puzzle: Lessons from COVID-19, leaders in government, academia, health care and business said biomedical and digital health advances of the last few years will help combat future health crises.

  • Researchers to study long COVID

    Data suggest that between 10% and 30% of those who have had an acute SARS-CoV-2 infection will experience the persistent pattern of symptoms known as long COVID.