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  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • Awards for promoting diversity

    An event at Stanford Hospital honors a school of medicine faculty member, a fellow and a student for their efforts to diversify the medical field and promote health equity.

  • Brain plasticity leads to worse seizures

    A brain mechanism needed for learning explains why epileptic seizures become more frequent, but a finding in rodents offers hope for treatment, according to a new study.

  • New members of arts, sciences academy

    Stanford Medicine professors David Relman and Abraham Verghese were among the nine Stanford faculty members elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Teens’ brains tuned to unfamiliar voices

    Around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices, part of the biological signal driving teens to separate from their parents, a Stanford Medicine study has found.

  • Moms of sick kids seek more health care

    Mothers facing the daily challenges of caring for children with congenital anomalies seek more health care and mental health services than other mothers, a Stanford-led study finds.

  • Pediatric bowel disease center launches

    A $70 million donation will enable researchers to offer more treatments to Stanford Children's Health patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease.

  • Diabetes drug linked to birth defects

    In men, the use of metformin may affect sperm development in a way that increases birth defects in their sons, a study found.

  • Two-mom families face more pregnancy risks

    In the first U.S. population-based study of obstetric health among sexual- and gender-minority parents, Stanford researchers find higher rates of some birth complications.

  • ‘Military police’ cells stem autoimmunity

    A new study has identified a way that the immune system shoots down its own cells when their anti-viral activity threatens to become friendly fire. The finding could pave the way to new treatments for autoimmune diseases.