Of Note

November 2019

Ann Dohn

Dohn, director of graduate medical education, received the 2019 Group on Resident Affairs Outstanding Service Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges for her work to improve the quality of graduate medical education.


Mary Goldstein, MD

Goldstein, professor of medicine, was inducted as a fellow into the American Medical College of Informatics. For more than 20 years, she has overseen a research program that applies health information technology to improve clinical care.


Steven Goodman, MD, PhD

Goodman, professor of medicine and of epidemiology and population health, as well as associate dean of clinical and translational research, was named chair of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s methodology committee.


Victor Henderson, MD, and Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

Henderson, professor of epidemiology and population health and of neurology and neurological sciences, and Rando, professor of neurology and neurological sciences, have been appointed honorary Skou professors at Aarhus University in Denmark. Henderson was appointed within the department of clinical medicine, and Rando was appointed within the department of biomedicine.

Nick Love, PhD

Love, a medical student, won the 2019 John Conley Art of Medicine Award sponsored by the AMA Journal of Ethics. He earned a $5,000 prize for his illustrated story, “Corpora Amylacea: Graphic Representation of Risks, Benefits, and Conundra of Cancer Screening,” to be published in the February 2020 issue.

Mark Musen, MD, PhD

Musen, professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, received an award from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. The $150,000 grant is for developing the next generation of Protégé, open-source software that aids biomedical research.


Serena Tan, MD

Tan was appointed assistant professor of pathology, effective Oct. 1. Her research focuses on pediatric and developmental diseases of the lung and heart.


Shipra Arya, MD

Arya, an associate professor of vascular surgery, was elected secretary of the Surgical Outcomes Club. She will ascend to the presidency in two years.

 


Gheorghe Chistol, PhD

Chistol was appointed assistant professor of chemical and systems biology, effective Sept. 1. His research employs single-molecule approaches to understand the mechanisms that safeguard the integrity of our genomes and what happens when these mechanisms fail.

 


Lawrence Fung, MD, PhD

Fung was appointed assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective July 1. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project and specializes in autism spectrum disorder. His research interests include neurodiversity, phenomenology and neurobiology of autism, as well as novel interventions for the condition.

 


Tamar Green, MD

Green was appointed assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective July 1. Her research interests are pediatric clinical neuroscience with an emphasis on neurogenetic and neurodevelopmental syndromes. She also uses genetic models to understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

 


Debra Kaysen, PhD

Kaysen was appointed professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Aug. 16. Her research interests focus on psychological treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder as well as mood and substance use disorders following traumatic events, especially for underserved populations and in low-resource communities.

 


Jonathan Lin, MD, PhD

Lin was appointed professor of pathology and of ophthalmology, effective July 1. His research interests are the mechanisms of retinal degeneration, neurodegeneration and eye pathology.

 


Julia Noel, MD

Noel was appointed assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, effective Sept. 1. She specializes in surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. She also has expertise in advanced and recurrent thyroid cancer, minimally invasive approaches and ultrasound-guided techniques.

 


Johannes Reiter, PhD

Reiter was appointed assistant professor of radiology, effective July 1. His research interests focus on the stochastic processes underlying cancer evolution, with the goal of improving the prognosis and treatment of tumors.

 


Vipul Sheth, MD, PhD

Sheth was appointed assistant professor of radiology, effective Aug. 1. His research focuses on translating magnetic resonance imaging methods to characterize the tumor microenvironment in pelvic malignancies and improve diagnosis, staging and therapy.

 


Hiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD

Shimada was appointed professor of pathology and of pediatrics, effective July 1. His research includes a focus on neuroblastomas, one of the most common pediatric solid tumors.

 


Surbhi Sidana, MD

Sidana was appointed assistant professor of medicine, effective Aug. 1. She specializes in treating plasma cell disorders, such as multiple myeloma and amyloidosis, with treatments that include blood and marrow transplantation and CAR-T cell therapy. Her research focuses on the development of novel therapeutic approaches, biomarkers and management of treatment toxicity.

 


Taia Wang, MD, PhD

Wang, assistant professor of medicine, of microbiology and of immunology, received two seven-year awards to study influenza immunity: a $1.5 million grant from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for improving knowledge of how influenza immunity develops during infancy and childhood, and a $2.2 million grant from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai for developing longer-lasting influenza vaccines.

 


Irving Weissman, MD

Weissman, the Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor in Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, director of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and professor of pathology and of developmental biology, received the Arthur Kornberg and Paul Berg Lifetime Achievement Award in Biomedical Sciences from the Stanford Medicine Alumni Association. The honor recognizes his contributions to stem cell research and translational therapies.

 


Jason Yeatman, PhD

Yeatman was appointed assistant professor of pediatrics and of education, effective Sept. 1. The director of the Brain Development & Education Lab in the Graduate School of Education, Yeatman focuses his research on the mechanisms of learning to read and how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia. A goal of the lab is to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences.

 


October 2019

Russ Altman, MD, PhD; Jake Lever, PhD

Altman, professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, and Lever, postdoctoral scholar in bioengineering, received a National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences ASPIRE 1 Challenge prize of $100,000 for their proposal to develop real-time text-mining to aid opioid researchers.

 


David Gate, PhD

Gate, a postdoctoral scholar in neurology and neurological sciences, received an Irene Diamond Fund/American Federation for Aging Research Postdoctoral Transition Award. The $120,000 grant is for his work exploring the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s disease.

 


Kyle Loh, PhD

Loh, assistant professor of developmental biology, received a David & Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering. The $875,000 grant, to be issued over five years, is for his work in building human cells from pluripotent stem cells.

 


Stephen Montgomery, PhD

Montgomery, associate professor of pathology and of genetics, received a 2019 early-career award from the American Society of Human Genetics. The award, which includes a $10,000 prize, recognizes the contributions of genetics and genomics scientists in the first 10 years of their careers as independent investigators.


Stanley Qi, PhD

Qi, assistant professor of bioengineering and of chemical and systems biology, was named to Science News’ Scientists to Watch 2019 list. The honor is for scientists age 40 and younger who are making outstanding contributions in their fields and show promise of making future advances.

 

 


Manpreet Singh, MD

Singh, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the 2019 Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation Award for Research in Depression or Suicide from the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. The $5,000 award was for “Limbic Intrinsic Connectivity in Depressed and High-Risk Youth,” of which she was the lead author. The paper was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

 


Michael Snyder, PhD

Snyder, professor of genetics, received an award from the Helmsley Charitable Trust. The $4 million grant will go toward studying the effect of environmental, biological and chemical exposures on the development and progression of Crohn’s disease.

 


Ken Sutha, MD, PhD

Sutha, a clinical instructor of pediatric nephrology, received the Hero of Hope award from the American Kidney Fund for his work in advocating for public policy that supports patients, funds kidney disease research, increases kidney transplants and improves care.

 


Michael Xiang, MD, PhD

 

Xiang, a resident in radiation oncology, received the American Radium Society Travel Award for his presentation on chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer in older women. He also received the American Society of Clinical Oncology Conquer Cancer Foundation Merit Award for his presentation on the risks of subsequent cancer diagnosis in patients treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated or proton beam radiation therapy.

 


Serena Hu, MD

Hu, professor of orthopaedic surgery, was named a president-elect of the American Orthopaedic Association. Her term as the first woman to serve as president will run from 2021 to 2022.


Michelle Monje, MD, PhD

Monje, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, is a co-principal investigator of a project that received $7.4 million from Cancer Research UK to study signals that prompt pediatric brain tumors. These tumors tend to appear at specific times and places in the growing brain. Monje’s team will use 3-D intact-tissue RNA sequencing to study when and where genes switch on in normal brain development and during the development of pediatric brain tumors. They aim to identify new drug targets.


Matthew Porteus, MD, PhD

Porteus, professor of pediatrics, received a three-year, $878,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation supporting his work to improve CRISPR-based gene correction in hematopoietic stem cells to cure sickle cell disease. 


Daniel Rubin, MD

Rubin, professor of biomedical data science and of radiology, was awarded a $50,000 grant from the faculty and research engagement program of Yahoo Research to support his use of ultrasound movie images to detect breast cancer. 


Edith Sullivan, PhD

Sullivan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the Research Society on Alcoholism’s Henri Begleiter Excellence in Research Award. The award recognizes a career in alcoholism research, specifically her study of brain-behavior relations, her collaboration with international scholars and her mentoring of developing scientists.


September 2019

Neal Amin, MD, PhD

Amin, resident in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the National Institute of Mental Health’s outstanding resident award, which recognizes psychiatry residents who show great potential for succeeding in research and academia.


Jessica Bentzley, MD

Bentzley, resident in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the Association for Academic Psychiatry’s resident psychiatric educator award, which honors residents who show promise as educators and scholars in academic psychiatry. 

 


Ira Glick, MD

Glick, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the Payne Whitney Clinic Award for Extraordinary Public Service from the Weill Medical College at Cornell University. He also received the Jackson E. Spears Community Service Award from New York Medical College.


Steven Goodman, MD, PhD

Goodman, professor of medicine, received the 2019 Abraham Lilienfeld Award from the American College of Epidemiology in recognition of his work in expanding knowledge of scientific and statistical inference and his contributions to epidemiology


Heather Wakelee, MD

Wakelee, professor of oncology, was named president-elect of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and assumed the role in September. Her two-year term as president will begin in 2021.


Marius Wernig, MD, PhD

Wernig was promoted to professor of pathology, effective July 1. His research focuses on investigating cellular reprogramming and advancing stem cell-based therapies for genetic diseases.


Nolan Williams, MD

Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the Klerman Prize for Exceptional Clinical Research from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation in recognition of his work in neurostimulation techniques, mechanistic understanding of rapid-acting antidepressants and the identification of biomarkers in treatment-resistant conditions.


Serena Yeung, PhD

Yeung was appointed assistant professor of biomedical data science, effective July 1. Her research interests include computer vision, machine learning and deep learning, with a focus on human-activity and video understanding in applications related to health care.


Christopher Almond, MD

Almond was promoted to professor of pediatrics, effective May 1. He directs clinical research in the Pediatric Advanced Care Therapies Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. His primary research interests are in multicenter clinical trials and learning health networks in pediatric heart failure, ventricular assist device support and cardiac transplantation.


Manuel Amieva, MD, PhD

Amieva was promoted to professor of pediatrics and of microbiology and immunology, effective July 1. He specializes in treating pediatric infectious diseases. His research focuses on understanding how bacteria colonize our skin and gastrointestinal epithelium, and how that can lead to infection and disease.


Leah Backhus, MD

Backhus, associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery, received the Dr. Dwight C. McGoon Award from the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association for her commitment to teaching and mentoring. She also received the Levi Watkins Innovation and Leadership Development Scholarship from the Thoracic Surgery Foundation. The Watkins award includes $5,000 to cover travel expenses incurred for the purpose of learning new thoracic surgery techniques.


Alistair Boettiger, PhD, and Leslie Mateo

Boettiger, assistant professor of developmental biology, and Mateo, a graduate student in developmental biology, were awarded a Gilliam Fellowship for Advanced Study. They will receive $50,000 a year for up to three years to promote inclusivity in laboratories and increase diversity in the life sciences. 

Catherine Curtin, MD

Curtin was promoted to professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery, effective July 1. She specializes in peripheral nerve surgery and upper limb reconstruction. Her research focuses on reducing pain and improving function for people with peripheral nerve injury, and improving upper limb function for people with spinal cord injury.


Lisa Giocomo, PhD

Giocomo, assistant professor of neurobiology, received a scholars award from the Vallee Foundation. The $300,000 grant is for basic biomedical research. Giocomo researches the neural mechanisms of cognition, specifically navigation.


Jeremy Heit, MD, PhD

Heit was appointed assistant professor of radiology, effective June 1. His research uses neuroimaging techniques to study diseases affecting the blood vessels and blood supply to the brain, with the goal of developing new minimally invasive treatments for these diseases.


Marie Hollenhorst, MD, PhD

Hollenhorst, clinical instructor of pathology, was awarded an early-career scientist grant from the National Blood Foundation. The two-year, $75,000 grant will support her research to understand how the sugar molecule CMP-Neu5Ac is made and how it regulates platelet number and function, with the goal of illuminating fundamental aspects of platelet biology and developing effective therapies for bleeding and clotting disorders.


K.C. Huang, PhD

Huang was promoted to professor of bioengineering and of microbiology and immunology, effective June 1. His research investigates the physical mechanisms of cell growth and the ecological principles underlying microbial community assembly and function.


Elizabeth Kidd, MD

Kidd was promoted to associate professor of radiation oncology, effective Aug. 1. Her clinical focus is treating gynecologic cancer and performing brachytherapy. Her research aims to optimize and individualize treatment for gynecologic cancers to improve disease control and quality of life for patients.


Shivaani Kummar, MD

Kummar, professor of oncology and radiology, was awarded the 2019 David R. Gandara Lectureship on Developmental Therapeutics from the UC-Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. The award is for visionary leadership in developmental therapeutics for cancer.


Robbie Majzner, MD

Majzner was appointed assistant professor of pediatrics, effective June 1. His research focuses on optimizing chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies to treat neuroblastoma, sarcomas and brain tumors, particularly for pediatric cancer patients.


Philip Pizzo, MD

Pizzo, the David and Susan Heckerman Professor and professor of microbiology and immunology, received the New York Academy of Medicine’s John Stearns Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Clinical Practice. The award is for extraordinary, careerlong contributions to the clinical practice of medicine.


Elsie Ross, MD

Ross, assistant professor of surgery, was awarded a K01 grant from the National Institutes of Health. The five-year, $162,000-per-year grant will support her study of artificial intelligence to enable early identification and treatment of peripheral artery disease. 


Birgitt Schuele, MD

Schuele, associate professor of pathology, was awarded a $100,000 grant from the Neukermans Family Fund. The grant supports her research into neuronal microcircuits in Parkinson’s disease.


Sharon Sha, MD

Sha, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, was appointed to the Alzheimer’s Prevention and Preparedness Task Force for the State of California. The task force presents recommendations to the governor on how local communities, private organizations, businesses, government and families can prepare for the rise in the number of cases of Alzheimer’s disease.


Katherine Travis, PhD

Travis was appointed assistant professor (research) of pediatrics, effective July 1. Her research uses advanced neuroimaging techniques to examine how white matter structures of the brain contribute to reading and language skills in children, with the goal of identifying and developing interventions for children who are at greatest risk of learning difficulties.


August 2019

Neera Ahuja, MD

Ahuja, clinical professor of medicine, was co-awarded a $1.8 million, five-year Reimagining Residency grant from the American Medical Association. She will lead a Stanford team in collaboration with teams from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the University of Alabama-Birmingham School of Medicine in a project to generate, implement and evaluate interventions to reduce resident burnout and improve clinical skill. The project will measure modifiable attributes of the training environment that contribute to burnout. The project is part of the association’s Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium of 37 medical schools.


Todd Alamin, MD

Alamin was promoted to professor of orthopaedic surgery, effective March 1. He specializes in minimally invasive spine surgery, spinal tumor surgery and reconstructive surgery for adults with scoliosis. His research focuses on diagnostic and therapeutic methods of understanding and treating spinal pathology.


Subhas Banerjee, MD

Banerjee was promoted to professor of medicine, effective April 1. He serves as the director of endoscopy, and his research evaluates advanced endoscopic procedures in the diagnosis and management of benign and malignant gastrointestinal disease.


Philip Beachy, PhD

Beachy, the Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor and professor of urology and of developmental biology, received the bladder cancer research innovation award from the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network. The two-year, $300,000 award supports novel and creative projects with the potential to produce breakthroughs in the management of bladder cancer. His research seeks to reduce bladder cancer recurrence by identifying and replacing diseased cells that persist in the bladder lining with healthy progenitor cells.


John Boothroyd, MD, PhD

Boothroyd, the Burt and Marion Avery Professor in Immunology and associate vice provost for graduate education and postdoctoral affairs, was appointed to the academic council of the Schmidt Science Fellows program. He will provide scientific and career mentoring for a group of fellows, and make his expertise available to all current fellows and senior fellows.


Beth Darnall, PhD

Darnall was appointed associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, effective May 1. She researches digital, brief, low-cost, scalable behavioral medicine treatments for reducing acute and chronic pain and associated burdens for patients, including how to best help physicians and patients successfully reduce chronic pain and long-term opioid use.


Miriam Goodman, PhD

Goodman, professor of molecular and cellular physiology, received the midcareer Landis Award for Outstanding Mentorship from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The award recognizes faculty members who have shown superior mentorship and training. It provides $100,000 to foster career development of additional trainees in her lab, where the research focuses on how skin and its embedded neurons give rise to touch sensation, and how sensory neurons bend without breaking.


Ronit Katz, MD

Katz, clinical associate professor of medicine, has been assigned by the adjutant general of the California National Guard to serve as state surgeon general for the California State Guard. The surgeon general analyzes, drafts, updates and implements medical plans, programs and policies for the California State Guard Medical Response Forces. A colonel in the California State Guard, Katz will lead the surgeon general’s office of the state guard at command section headquarters.


Seung Kim, MD, PhD

Kim, professor of developmental biology, will serve as a member of the National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review’s Cellular Aspects of Diabetes and Obesity Study Section for the term that began July 1 and ends June 30, 2023. Members are selected on the basis of their demonstrated competence and achievement in their scientific disciplines.


Feliks Kogan, PhD

Kogan was appointed assistant professor (research) of radiology, effective May 1. His research focuses on imaging of musculoskeletal function and disease, including developing technologies to detect disease at its earliest stages, and using those new methods to improve patient outcomes.


Ansuman Satpathy, MD, PhD

Satpathy was appointed assistant professor of pathology, effective July 1. His research focuses on developing and applying genome-scale technologies to study fundamental properties of the immune system in health, infection and cancer.


Carolyn Seib, MD, MAS

Seib was appointed assistant professor of surgery, effective April 28. She specializes in endocrine surgery, and her research focuses on the management of endocrine disorders in older adults, including the study of long-term outcomes in elderly people with primary hyperparathyroidism treated with medical or surgical therapy.


Matthew Strehlow, MD

Strehlow, associate professor of emergency medicine, received the lifetime achievement award from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine/Global Emergency Medicine Academy. This award is given to an academy member who has consistently embodied the academy’s ideal of improving the delivery of acute and emergency care through service, leadership, mentorship and academic endeavor.


Lisa Wise-Faberowski, MD

Wise-Faberowski was promoted to associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, effective April 1. Her research focuses on the neurological effects of anesthesia in young children.


Peng Wu, MD, PhD

Wu, fellow in pediatric hematology/oncology, was awarded a Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. The four-year, $231,000 award will support her research using new techniques to culture patient-derived cancer cells to understand how abnormal activation of the Wnt signaling pathway drives cell proliferation and irregular differentiation in hepatoblastoma, with the goal of new treatment strategies for liver cancer and other rare tumors.


Charles Yu, MD

Yu was appointed assistant professor of ophthalmology, effective May 1. He specializes in cornea and refractive surgery. His research, supported by the National Eye Institute and the Department of Defense, involves new technologies for overcoming cornea blindness and ways to improve artificial corneal transplants.


Francis Blankenberg, MD, Katherine Ferrara, PhD, and Tarik Massoud, MD, PhD

Blankenberg, associate professor of pediatric radiology; Ferrara, professor of radiology; and Massoud, professor of radiology, were among the 37 researchers who received the 2019 Distinguished Investigator Award from the Academy for Radiology & Biomedical Imaging Research. The award acknowledges and celebrates high levels of achievement in the field of academic imaging research.

Scott Boyd, MD, PhD; Michelle Monje, MD, PhD; and Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD

Boyd, associate professor of pathology; Monje, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences; and Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government to outstanding scientists and engineers who are beginning their independent research careers and who show exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology.

Lisa Chamberlain, MD, MPH

Chamberlain was promoted to professor of pediatrics, effective June 1. Her research explores health inequities, specifically for low-income pediatric populations in California. She focuses on children with chronic illness. She is the associate chair of policy and community engagement in the Department of Pediatrics.


Tara Chang, MD

Chang was promoted to associate professor of medicine, effective May 1. Her clinical research focuses on cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease, with an emphasis on blood pressure control, coronary revascularization and the comparative effectiveness of cardioprotective medications. Her long-term goal is to improve outcomes in these high-risk patients.


Lorinda Chung, MD

Chung was promoted to professor of medicine, effective April 1. She specializes in caring for patients with systemic sclerosis and related diseases. Her research investigates treatments for systemic sclerosis and the pathogenesis of the disease.


Maria Inmaculada Cobos Sillero, MD, PhD

Cobos was appointed assistant professor of pathology, effective June 1. Her lab uses single-cell methods to gain insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.


Dana Haering and Linda Hoff

Haering, chief financial officer of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Hoff, chief financial officer of Stanford Health Care, are included in Becker’s Hospital Review’s list of 106 CFOs to know in 2019. Nominations and selections were made through an editorial review process.

Vivianne Tawfik, MD, PhD

Tawfik, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, has been awarded a 2019 Rita Allen Foundation Award in Pain grant. The three-year, $50,000 per year award will support her research into the unique underpinnings of various types of chronic pain and how central nervous system glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain.


Brad Zuchero, PhD

Zuchero assistant professor of neurosurgery, received a 2019 Beckman Young Investigator award from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. The award, which includes $600,000 in funding over four years, is given to promising young faculty members in the early stages of their academic careers in the chemical and life sciences. Zuchero will use the award to support his study of novel roles of myelination in the development, function and diseases of the nervous system.


July 2019

Cristina Alvira, MD

Alvira was appointed associate professor of pediatrics, effective March 1. Her research aims to identify mechanisms that direct lung growth and repair in infants and children, with the goal of developing new treatments for pediatric lung diseases.


Charles K.F. Chan, MD

Chan, assistant professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery, has been awarded an arthritis and aging research grant, sponsored by the American Federation for Aging Research and the Arthritis National Research Foundation. The $100,000 grant will fund his research to identify a way to resurface osteoarthritic joints with new cartilage.


Nida Degesys, MD

Degesys, clinical instructor in emergency medicine, was named fellow of the year by the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association. The $500 award recognizes a member who has demonstrated significant dedication to promoting the goals and objectives of the association at local, state and national levels, and who has a record of creativity, enthusiasm and accomplishment in addressing emergency medicine issues.


Karen Hirsch, MD

Hirsch was promoted to associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, effective March 1. Her clinical focus is on caring for critically ill patients with neurologic disorders, including traumatic brain injury, stroke and post-cardiac-arrest coma. Her research examines techniques for targeting resuscitation and predicting outcomes in patients with cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury.


Gabriel Mannis, MD

Mannis was appointed assistant professor of medicine, effective April 1. His research focuses on developing therapies for acute leukemia, with a particular interest in using immunotherapy, targeted agents and predictive biomarkers as a means to improve outcomes and quality of life for patients with hematologic malignancies.


Greer Murphy Jr., MD, PhD, and Alan Schatzberg, MD

Murphy, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, have received the David A. Mrazek Award in Psychiatric Pharmacogenomics from the  American Psychiatric Association. They were among the first to apply genetic technology to predict medication response in psychiatric patients and have published a series of pioneering studies, including research that identifies genetic markers that affect responses to antidepressants.

Manali Patel, MD

Patel, assistant professor of medicine, received a 2019 Research Grant on Disparities in Lung Cancer from the Lung Cancer Research Foundation with support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The grant provides $150,000 over two years to support her project on using social support to engage patients in their care and improve access to end-of-life cancer care for low-income and minority patients with advanced stages of cancer.


Thomas Quertermous, MD

Quertermous, the William G. Irwin Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine, received a three-year Seed Networks project grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. As a member of one of 38 collaborative teams funded by this grant, his work will support the continued development of the Human Cell Atlas, an international effort to map all cells in the human body. His team will work to create an atlas of single cell transcriptomic and epigenomic features of the human vasculature to define the cellular composition and key regulatory features of these vessels.


Laura Roberts, MD

Roberts, professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor, has been selected as the next editor-in-chief of Academic Medicine. Her five-year term begins Jan. 1. She is the first psychiatrist and second female editor-in-chief since the journal was founded in 1926. She served as editor-in-chief for the journal Academic Psychiatry from 2002-2019 and has been a member of the editorial board for Academic Medicine since 2013.


Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

Sarin, assistant professor of dermatology, was named a Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator by the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. The three-year, $600,000 early investigator award will support her research looking at a group of patients with extreme proliferation of basal-cell skin cancer to identify the genetic mechanisms that contribute to cancer susceptibility, and to develop new nonsurgical therapies for these patients. The foundation also repays medical school debt up to $100,000 still owed by the awardee.


Birgitt Schuele, MD, DrMed

Schule was appointed associate professor (research) of pathology, effective Feb. 1. Her research uses genetics and human stem cell models to investigate the underlying causes of neurodegeneration and to develop innovative biomarkers and new therapeutic approaches for Parkinson’s disease.


Edda Spiekerkoetter, MD

Spiekerkoetter was appointed associate professor of medicine, effective March 1. Her research focuses on the genetic basis of pulmonary hypertension symptoms, with the goal of identifying new treatment methods. She also investigates the development of malformations in the lung in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and co-directs the HHT clinic.


Pervez Sultan, MBChB, MD(Res)

Sultan was appointed associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, effective April 1. He specializes in obstetric anesthesiology, and his research explores women’s immune function and recovery following childbirth.


June 2019

Mark Berry, MD

Berry was promoted to professor of cardiothoracic surgery, effective March 1. He specializes in treating thoracic surgical conditions with minimally invasive techniques, such as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic and bronchoscopic approaches. His research focuses on the use of such techniques and on evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies.


Mimi Borelli, MBBS

Borelli, a postdoctoral scholar in plastic and reconstructive surgery, was awarded a pilot research grant from The Plastic Surgery Foundation. The $10,000 award will fund her research on the cJUN protein and how it regulates a profibrotic wound healing response.

Dominic Henn, MD

Henn, a postdoctoral research fellow in plastic and reconstructive surgery, received a translational research grant from The Plastic Surgery Foundation. The $50,000 grant will support his research exploring the application of CRISPR/Cas9-edited dendritic cells for angiogenesis and wound healing.

Kyle Loh, PhD

Loh, assistant professor of developmental biology, has been named a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences. The program provides funding to young investigators of outstanding promise. He will receive $300,000 over four years to support his research focused on embryonic stem cell differentiation and tissue transplants.


Michael Longaker, MD

Longaker, the Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and co-director of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, was awarded the Lifetime Achievement award by the Society of University Surgeons. The award recognizes individuals who have had a sustained career in academic surgery with contributions to surgical science, and demonstrated a commitment to the society.


Michael Ostacher, MD, MPH

Ostacher was promoted to professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective March 1. He directs the Bipolar Disorder and Depression Research Program at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. His primary research interest is in large clinical trials in bipolar disorder and depression, and the implementation of evidence-based mental health practices.


Jordan Taylor, MD

Taylor, a research fellow in pediatric surgery, received the Quick Shots of Distinction Award in Basic Science from the American Pediatric Surgical Association. The award recognized his research on lengthening the small intestine by placing a compressed spring within the bowel.

Lu Tian, ScD

Tian was promoted to professor of biomedical data science, effective March 1. His research focuses on developing advanced statistical methods for predicting health outcomes and guiding the practice of precision medicine. He is also interested in statistical methodology to integrate information from multiple sources, including data from clinical trials and patient outcomes.


Xinnan Wang, MD, PhD

Wang was promoted to associate professor of neurosurgery, effective April 1. Her research focuses on investigating the mechanisms controlling the transport and function of mitochondria, with an emphasis on understanding how even subtle interference with these processes may contribute to neurodegenerative disorders.


Joanna Wysocka, PhD

Wysocka, the Lorry Lokey Professor and professor of chemical and systems biology and of developmental biology, was elected as an associate member of the European Molecular Biology Organization, a group of researchers who promote excellence in the life sciences in Europe and beyond.


Dan Eisenberg, MD

Eisenberg, associate professor of surgery, was awarded a Health Services Research & Development Merit Grant from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The three-year, $750,000 grant will fund his study to assess the quality of obesity screening in veterans with spinal-cord injuries who receive care in the Veterans Health Administration, and to evaluate the need for adjusted body mass index morbidity risk zones for these individuals.


Billy Loo, MD, PhD

Loo was promoted to professor of radiation oncology, effective March 1. He specializes in radiation therapy for lung and other thoracic cancers, including stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and 4D image-guided radiation therapy for lung tumors, and leads the thoracic radiation oncology clinical service. His clinical research focuses on implementation of new treatment techniques for lung cancer and on the development of new medical imaging methods for measuring organ function and predicting response to cancer treatment.


Angela Lumba-Brown, MD

Lumba-Brown, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine and of pediatrics and co-director of the Stanford Brain Performance Center, has been awarded a student athlete health and well-being grant from the Pac-12 Conference for research on head trauma. The grant is part of a collective effort between the conference and its member universities to find ways to keep student-athletes as safe as possible. The grant will provide $356,168 over three years to support her study of concussion classification in student athletes.


Marc Melcher, MD, PhD

Melcher, associate professor of surgery, was elected president of the San Francisco Surgical Society. His one-year term begins Sept. 18.


Lloyd Minor, MD

Minor, dean of the School of Medicine and professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, received the Rambam Award from the Rambam Health Care Campus teaching hospital in Israel. The award is conferred based on candidates’ contributions to medicine, science, technology, leadership and humanity and recognizes the achievements of remarkable individuals for their passion, caring and special generosity to Israel.


Cori Poffenberger, MD

Poffenberger, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine, has been selected for the 2019-20 Rathmann Foundation E4C Medical Education Fellowship in Patient-Centered Care from the Stanford Office of Medical Education. The one-year, $55,000 fellowship allows Stanford faculty, fellows and chief residents to pursue activities related to patient-centered care in medical education.


Jeffrey Sakamoto, MD

Sakamoto, resident in emergency medicine, has been elected a member-at-large of the resident and medical student board of directors of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The society works to improve care for acutely ill and injured patients through research and education.

Alan Schatzberg, MD

Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris Jr. Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, received the Solomon A. Berson Medical Alumni Achievement Award from the New York University School of Medicine. The award, named for the founder of the radioimmunoassay, honors Schatzberg’s career in investigating the biology and biopharmacology of depressive disorders.


Anne Villeneuve, PhD

Villeneuve, professor of developmental biology and of genetics, received the 2019 Genetics Society of America Medal. The award honors an individual member of the society for outstanding contributions to the field of genetics in the past 15 years. She was recognized for her research on the mechanisms governing chromosome inheritance during sexual reproduction.


Sherry Wren, MD

Wren, professor of surgery, has joined the World Health Organization’s Expert Advisory Panel on Surgical Care and Anaesthesia. Her four-year term began on June 1.


May 2019

Rania Awaad, MD

Awaad, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford Muslim Mental Health Lab, received the community achievement award from Access California Services and Los Angeles County for exceptional commitment to promoting mental health well-being. The award was presented at Access California’s 2019 Peace of Mind: A Family Wellness Event.


Heike Daldrup-Link, MD

Daldrup-Link, professor of radiology, will receive the Harry Fischer Award for Excellence in Contrast Media Research at the 2019 Contrast Media Research Symposium in November. The award, which includes a $5,000 honorarium, recognizes a career of excellence in innovation, quality and leadership. It will be presented following her delivery of the Harry Fischer Lecture at the symposium.


Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

Diehn, associate professor of radiation oncology, is co-recipient of a Phillip A. Sharp Award for Innovation in Collaboration from Stand Up To Cancer. The two-year grant, totaling $225,000, will fund his work with Aaron Hata, MD, PhD, of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, on analyzing cell-free RNA in non-small cell lung cancer in order to detect changes in cancer phenotypes during treatment.


Carlos Esquivel, MD, PhD

Esquivel, the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor in Pediatric Transplantation, professor of surgery and of pediatrics, and chief of the division of abdominal transplantation, was elected president of the International Pediatric Transplant Association. He will be president-elect for two years before taking office at the association’s 2021 congress in Prague.


Donald Frush, MD

Frush, professor of radiology, received the 2019 gold medal from the Society for Pediatric Radiology. The medal is awarded to pediatric radiologists and others who have contributed greatly to the society and the subspecialty of pediatric radiology as scientists, teachers, mentors and leaders.


Electron Kebebew, MD

Kebebew, the Harry A. Oberhelman Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor and chief of general surgery, has accepted the role of editor in chief of Thyroid, the official journal of the American Thyroid Association, starting with the January 2020 issue. He has served as an associate editor of the journal since 2012.


Abby King, PhD

King, professor of health research and policy and of medicine, will receive the inaugural lifetime achievement award for outstanding contributions to the field of behavioral nutrition and physical activity from the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. She will receive the award in June at the society’s annual scientific conference in Prague.


Miquell Miller, MD

Miller, resident in general surgery, was awarded the Claude H. Organ Jr., MD, FACS Resident Research Award at the 2019 national conference for the Society of Black Academic Surgeons. Her abstract, “Racial disparities in surgical care and mortality across common tumor types,” was recognized as one of the top three abstracts presented.

Anca Pasca, MD

Pasca, assistant professor of pediatrics, was a joint winner of the inaugural Bhatt-Ramanathan scholarship award from the California Association of Neonatologists. The award recognizes her accomplishments in advancing knowledge of brain injury from prematurity using human organoid models.


Carla Pugh, MD, PhD

Pugh, professor of surgery, was named the best plenary presenter at the Association for Surgical Education’s 2019 meeting. Her presentation was titled “Use of error management theory to quantify and characterize residents’ error recovery strategies.”


Saul Rosenberg, MD

Rosenberg, professor emeritus of medicine and the Maureen Lyles D’Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus, was one of 15 inductees into the 2019 Giants of Cancer Care awards program organized by OncLive, a group of specialized publications. He was recognized for his contributions in the clinical study of lymphoma. The Giants of Cancer Care program celebrates innovators who have made remarkable achievements in oncology research and clinical practice.


Marcella Alsan, MD, PhD

Alsan, associate professor of medicine, is co-recipient of the 2019 Kenneth J. Arrow Award from the International Health Economics Association. She and Marianne Wanamaker, PhD, of the University of Tennessee won the award for “Tuskegee and the Health of Black Men,” a paper published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics. The award recognizes excellence in health economics and is named for the late Nobel laureate and Stanford economist.


Jacob Blythe

Blythe, a third-year medical student, was awarded a 2019 medical fellowship from the Fellowships at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics. He will travel to Germany and Poland this summer to participate in a two-week program that focuses on contemporary professional ethics in light of the conduct of physicians in Nazi-occupied Europe.

Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, and Andrew Huberman, PhD

Goldberg, professor and chair of ophthalmology, and Huberman, associate professor of neurobiology and of ophthalmology, have each received grants from the Gilbert Family Foundation’s Vision Restoration Initiative to accelerate the development of therapies for neurofibromatosis type 1, a rare disease characterized by symptoms including optic gliomas, which are benign tumors that can lead to optic nerve damage and vision loss. The awards, totaling $3 million, will fund their efforts to advance therapies for protecting and restoring retinal ganglion cells and vision in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated optic gliomas.

Aida Habtezion, MD

Habtezion, associate professor of gastroenterology and hepatology, was awarded a $1 million grant from the Leona and Harry B. Helmsley Foundation for a feasibility study assessing myoelectric activity patterns in Crohn’s disease patients during flares and remission.


Mary Hawn, MD, MPH

Hawn, the chair of surgery and the Stanford Medicine Professor of Surgery, was elected secretary of the American Surgical Association. It is a five-year appointment.


Rebecca Richards, MD, PhD

Richards, a fellow in pediatric hematology/oncology, will receive a grant for $195,000 from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The award will support her efforts to develop CAR-T cells targeting the CD93 protein for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

Laura Roberts, MD

Roberts, professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor, has been voted president-elect of the American College of Psychiatrists.


Tait Shanafelt, MD

Shanafelt, the Jeanie and Stew Ritchie Professor, professor of medicine, chief wellness officer and associate dean, received an honorary fellowship from the American Association for Physician Leadership. He was recognized for his pioneering research into and advocacy for physician well-being over the past 20 years, and for helping create the field of organizational and systems approaches to physician wellness.


Robert Tibshirani, PhD

Tibshirani, professor of biomedical data science and of statistics, was elected a fellow of The Royal Society, the world’s oldest independent scientific academy. He was recognized for his seminal contributions to the fields of bioinformatics and statistics, namely his invention of statistical tools for extracting information from data.


April 2019

Nicholas Giori, MD, PhD

Giori was promoted to professor of orthopaedic surgery, effective March 1. His research examines orthopaedic biomechanics and assesses the design and function of joint replacements. His work also uses large medical databases to investigate important questions relating to joint replacement surgery.


Richard Hoppe, MD

Hoppe, the Henry S. Kaplan-Harry Lebeson Professor of Cancer Biology and professor of radiation oncology, received the Rodger Winn Award from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. He is the founding chair of the network’s guidelines panel for Hodgkin lymphoma and is a member of two additional panels. He was recognized for expert judgment and commitment to excellence in service of the guidelines, and for his collegial and respectful manner, compassion, thoughtfulness and preparedness. The award is in memory of the first leader of the guidelines program.


Andrei Iagaru, MD

Iagaru was promoted to professor of radiology, effective Feb. 1. His research interests include early cancer detection using positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography; clinical translation of PET radiopharmaceuticals; and peptide-based diagnostic imaging and therapy. He is chief of the division of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging.


Anita Kishore, MD

Kishore, clinical associate professor of psychiatry, was awarded a 2019-20 Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program grant. The two-year, $32,750 scholarship will support her work to build, strengthen and enhance collaborative mentorship programs and networks for medical students interested in child psychiatry in the Netherlands, Australia and India. The goal is to increase access to child psychiatric services worldwide.


Ruth Lathi, MD

Lathi was promoted to professor of obstetrics and gynecology, effective March 1. She is the director of the recurrent pregnancy loss program and specializes in reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Her research interests include genetic causes of miscarriages and the prognostic value of genetic testing related to miscarriage; the role of preimplantation genetic diagnosis; and the long-term outcomes of fertility treatments.


Kyle Loh, PhD, and Bo Wang, PhD

Loh, assistant professor of developmental biology, and Wang, assistant professor of bioengineering, are on separate research teams that will each receive a grant from the international Human Frontier Science Program. The three-year, $250,000-per-year grants are awarded to teams of researchers from different countries. Wang’s team will study how an immune response can shift from being beneficial to being harmful. Loh’s team will study the role of vasculature in the development of brain tissue.

Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD

Rodriguez was promoted to associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences effective March 1. Her research investigates the neurobiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder and related mental health conditions, with the aim of developing targeted, rapid-acting treatments that relieve suffering.


Michael Snyder, PhD

Snyder, the Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor in Genetics, chair of genetics and director of the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, will receive the 2019 George W. Beadle Award from the Genetics Society of America. The award recognizes significant, sustained service to the genetics community. He was recognized for developing and disseminating widely used technology for the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes, RNA molecules and proteins.


Jordan Taylor, MD

Taylor, a research scholar in pediatric surgery, received the Pacific Association of Pediatric Surgeons’ Basic Science Prize, which includes $750, for his abstract entitled “Replicating and identifying large cell neuroblastoma using high-dose intra-tumoral chemotherapy and automated digital analysis.” He also received two awards from the International Pediatric Endosurgical Group: the 2019 IPEG Coolest Trick Award, in recognition of an innovative approach to a clinical problem, and the 2019 IPEG Research Institute Against Digestive Cancer Award, which is given to the best abstract presentation by a resident. Both awards were for the work titled “Small surgeries, big smiles: Reducing sedation through virtual reality.” The award from the institute includes a trip to Strasbourg, France, to participate in a course in pediatric minimally invasive surgery at the European Institute of Telesurgery. 

Gozde Durmus, PhD

Durmus was appointed assistant professor (research) of radiology, effective Feb. 1. Her research focuses on developing tools to detect and investigate circulating biomarkers and rare cells from biological fluids for precision medicine.


Aaron Gitler, PhD

Gitler, professor of genetics, will receive the 2019 Sheila Essey Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the ALS Association and the American Brain Foundation. The $50,000 prize recognizes significant contributions in the search for the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, as well as ways to prevent and cure the disease. His research uses genetic screening to focus on mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and ALS.


Jaime Lopez, MD

Lopez was promoted to professor of neurology and neurological sciences, effective Feb. 1. He founded and directs the Stanford Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring Program. His research focuses on developing techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures, and identifying how these techniques alter surgical management and patient outcomes.


Juno Obedin-Maliver, MD, MPH, MAS

Obedin-Maliver was appointed assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, effective Feb. 1. She specializes in gynecological and reproductive health care needs of sexual and gender minority people, and she co-directs the PRIDE Study, a national longitudinal study of sexual and gender minority adults.


Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD

Rodriguez was promoted to associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective March 1. Her research investigates the neurobiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder and related mental health conditions, with the aim of developing targeted, rapid-acting treatments.


Yuanjia Zhu, MD

Zhu, resident in cardiothoracic surgery, received a $60,000 research fellowship award from the Thoracic Surgery Foundation, the charitable arm of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. The award will support her effort to engineer blood vessels that are similar to arteries and that have the potential to promote the growth of additional vessels.

March 2019

Greg Albers, MD

Albers, the Coyote Foundation Professor and professor of neurology and neurological sciences, was the principal investigator of a study that received a 2019 Distinguished Clinical Research Achievement Award from the Clinical Research Forum, a national organization that honors impactful peer-reviewed studies. Albers led the DEFUSE 3 Study, a multicenter clinical trial on stroke treatment that showed the largest positive treatment effect ever achieved in a stroke study, and that immediately led to new international guidelines to extend the treatment window for stroke.


E.J. Chichilnisky, PhD

Chichilnisky, the John R. Adler Professor and professor of neurosurgery and of ophthalmology, received a Research to Prevent Blindness Stein Innovation Award. The three-year, $300,000 award will support his study of visual processing in the human retina and how it relates to established animal models, including a new application for high-resolution electrical recordings in the areas of the retina responsible for high-acuity vision.


Amit Etkin, MD, PhD

Etkin was promoted to professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective March 1. His research examines the neuroscience of emotion and cognitive regulation, as well as basic aspects of neural circuit functioning, in healthy people and people with psychiatric disorders.


Julie Kauer, PhD

Kauer was appointed professor (research) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Jan. 1. Her research uses mouse models to understand the roles of synaptic plasticity in spinal cord circuitry, as well as the effects of pain, acute stress and drug addiction on synaptic plasticity in the brain.


Kilian Pohl, PhD

Pohl was appointed associate professor (research) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Nov. 1. His research uses computational science to identify biomedical phenotypes with the aim of improving the mechanistic understanding, diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

Laura Roberts, MD

Roberts, the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and chair and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the 2019 recipient of the annual lifetime service award from the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training. The award recognizes a member who has provided significant service to the association, had an impact on psychiatric residency education nationally, demonstrated excellence in psychiatric residency education, and is committed to empowering and educating the next generation of psychiatrists.


Samuel So, MD

So, the Lui Hac Minh Professor in the School of Medicine and professor of surgery and director of the Asian Liver Center, has been chosen as a 2019 Asia Game Changer Award Honoree by the Asia Society. He was recognized for his efforts to eliminate hepatitis B and reduce the burden of liver cancer in Asia and in Asian-Americans.


Leah Backhus, MD, MPH

Backhus, associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery, was awarded $5,000 for the Levi Watkins Innovation and Leadership Development Scholarship from The Thoracic Surgery Foundation. She also won the Thoracic Surgery Residents’ Association’s 2019 McGoon Teaching Award, which is given annually to an outstanding young faculty member in cardiothoracic surgery in recognition of a commitment to resident education and mentorship.


Robert Castro, MD

Castro, clinical professor of pediatrics, has accepted an appointment to serve on the American Board of Pediatrics Subboard of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. His term ends Dec. 31, 2024.


Dylan Griswold

Griswold, a third-year medical student, has been awarded a 2019 Gates Cambridge Scholarship from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to pursue graduate studies at the University of Cambridge in England. He plans to spend three years at Cambridge pursuing a doctorate in clinical neurosciences with a focus on neurosurgery, then return to Stanford to complete his medical degree.

Timothy Keyes

Keyes, an MD-PhD student, will receive the national Building the Next Generation of Academic Physicians Junior Leadership Award for his work promoting the advancement of LGBTQ+ health-related issues and the LGBTQ+ community.

Henry Lee, MD

Lee, associate professor of pediatrics, was elected to the membership of the American Pediatric Society. He focuses on improving the safety and quality of care for mothers and newborns by studying childbirth-related health care provisions at the population level and using simulation methodology to evaluate new protocols and products.


Eleni Linos, MD, DrPH

Linos was appointed professor of dermatology, effective Feb. 1. Her research aims to better understand the causes of skin cancer and apply the knowledge to cancer prevention using social media and smartphone technology. She also works to help cancer patients make informed treatment decisions that are tailored to individual preferences and personal characteristics.


Mitchell Lunn, MD

Lunn was appointed assistant professor of medicine, effective Feb. 1. His research focuses on improving the understanding of factors that influence the health of sexual and gender minority people, including health disparities, societal experiences, provider education and institutional climate. He co-directs the PRIDE Study, a national longitudinal study of sexual and gender minority adults.


Ruth O'Hara, PhD

O’Hara was promoted to professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Dec. 1. Her research investigates the relationship between neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms across the life span, with emphasis on the identification of biological and sleep biomarkers of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.


Zara Patel, MD

Patel was promoted to associate professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, effective Jan. 1. She specializes in advanced endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery, and her research interests include studying ways to avoid complications in sinus surgery, developing new devices and techniques for sinus and skull base surgery, and improving treatment for olfactory loss.


Jochen Profit, MD, MPH

Profit, associate professor of pediatrics, was appointed to the Committee on Assessing Health Outcomes by Birth Settings, a project within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The project aims to provide an evidence-based analysis of research findings about different birth environments, such as hospital versus home, focusing on the health outcomes of sub-populations of women. His term ends on March 31, 2020.


Melinda Telli, MD

Telli was promoted to associate professor of medicine, effective Jan. 1. She leads the breast oncology clinical research group at the Stanford Cancer Institute, and her research focuses on developing new therapies to treat triple-negative and hereditary breast cancers, including targeting tumors with DNA-repair defects.


Nolan Williams, MD

Williams was appointed assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Feb. 1. He specializes in developing brain stimulation methodologies, and his research interests include understanding rapid-acting antidepressants and identifying biomarkers that predict responses to treatments such as brain stimulation for neuropsychiatric conditions.


February 2019

Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD

Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He was honored for pioneering molecular and optical tools for discovery and control of neuronal signals affecting behavior in health and disease.


Richard Hoppe, MD

Hoppe, the Henry S. Kaplan-Harry Lebeson Professor in Cancer Biology and professor of radiation oncology, will receive the inaugural American Radium Society Gold Medal Award in recognition of his exemplary professionalism, leadership, contributions to the field of medicine and service to the society.


Mark Nicolls, MD

Nicolls, the Stanford University Professor in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, was awarded a $2.3 million R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health. The four-year grant will support his study of the role of inflammation in lymphedema, a chronic condition caused by lymphatic obstruction that leads to disfigured and swollen extremities.


Teresa Nicolson, PhD

Nicolson was appointed professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, effective Jan. 1. Her research aims to understand the molecular basis of hearing and balance, with a focus on studying the function of deafness genes and developmental aspects of sensory hair-cell activity and synapse formation.


David Ouyang, MD

Ouyang, cardiology fellow, has been awarded the American College of Cardiology/Merck Research Fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease and Cardiometabolic Disorders Award. The $70,000 award will support his study of big data analysis and machine learning in cardiovascular imaging.

Manali Patel, MD, and Lisa Goldman Rosas, PhD

Patel, assistant professor of oncology, and Rosas, assistant professor of health research and policy and of medicine, are among five principal investigators leading a new project funded by a $3 million California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine grant from the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research. The grant supports proof-of-principle demonstration projects for patient populations suffering from cancer health disparities, with the aim of improving access, care and outcomes through collaboration between academic, community, nonprofit and private partners. Their project is focused on Monterey County

Corinna Zygourakis, MD

Zygourakis was appointed assistant professor of neurosurgery, effective Jan 1. She specializes in the comprehensive surgical care of the adult spine, including revision surgery, and treats complex spine disorders, such as spinal deformity and spinal tumors. Her research examines health care costs, quality of neurosurgical care and spine surgery outcomes.


Nidhi Bhutani, PhD

Bhutani was promoted to associate professor of orthopaedic surgery, effective Dec. 1. Her research focuses on understanding stem cell development, disease and regeneration in the musculoskeletal system, with the aim of improving clinical care.


Mary Hawn, MD

Hawn, the Stanford Medicine Professor of Surgery and professor and chair of surgery, was chosen by the executive council of the Society of Black Academic Surgeons as a 2019 Honorary Fellow. She was recognized for her contributions to the careers of many of the organization’s members and to surgery in the United States.


Dáibhid Ó Maoiléidigh, PhD

Maoiléidigh was appointed assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, effective Jan. 1. He employs mathematical and computational approaches to understand how the hearing and balance organs of the inner ear process sensory input.

 


Theresa Tacy, MD

Tacy was appointed professor of pediatrics, effective Nov. 1. She is the medical director of fetal cardiology, and she specializes in echocardiography, including diagnosing and treating fetal heart defects and diseases.


Courtney Wusthoff, MD

Wusthoff was promoted to associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, effective Dec. 1. Her research uses electroencephalography to examine the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors in newborns with, or at risk for, brain injury, with an aim toward identifying protective treatments.


Paul Yock, MD

Yock, the Martha Meier Weiland Professor in the School of Medicine, professor of bioengineering and director of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, received the 2019 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize from the National Academy of Engineering. The $100,000 award recognizes innovations in medical devices that enable minimally invasive angioplasty treatment of advanced coronary artery disease.


January 2019

Megan Albertelli, DVM, PhD

Albertelli was promoted to associate professor of comparative medicine, effective Nov. 1. Her research focuses on genetic variation in breast and prostate cancers, and the development and refinement of mouse models of cancer and celiac disease. She also investigates ways to improve the welfare of animals in laboratory settings.


Ruben Alvero, MD

Alvero was appointed professor of obstetrics and gynecology, effective Dec. 1. His clinical focuses include infertility, polycystic ovary disease, endometriosis and reproductive surgery. His research aims to improve the understanding and treatment of unexplained infertility.


Harry Greenberg, MD

Greenberg, the Joseph D. Grant Professor in the School of Medicine and professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology, is the recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Achievement Award in Basic Science from the American Gastroenterological Association. The award honors a senior investigator whose work has significantly advanced the science or practice of gastroenterology, or both, and includes a $5,000 honorarium.


Ed Kopetsky

Kopetsky, chief information officer for Stanford Children’s Health, was awarded the 2018 John E. Gall Jr. CIO of the Year award by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. Under Kopetsky’s  leadership, Stanford Children’s Health has undergone large-scale advances in enterprise systems and customer service.

Nicholas Leeper, MD

Leeper, associate professor of surgery and of medicine, has been awarded an Emerging Investigator Award by the National Institutes of Health. The seven-year, $5.9 million grant will support his research on clonal expansion, resistance to efferocytosis (the removal of dead or damaged cells) and innate immunity in atherosclerosis.


Robert Ohgami, MD, PhD

Ohgami was promoted to associate professor of pathology, effective Dec. 1. His research focuses on classifying and understanding hematopoietic diseases such as Castleman disease, acute myeloid leukemia and T- and B-cell disorders using molecular technologies, digital imaging approaches and computational methodologies.


Nidhi Rohatgi, MD

Rohatgi, clinical associate professor of medicine, has been named one of the 10 top hospitalists of 2018 by ACPHospitalist, a publication of the American College of Physicians. The editorial board selected her from nominees across the nation for her dedication to patient care. She was honored for her work improving transitions in care, preventing medical complications in surgical patients and preventing hospital-acquired delirium.


Maria Grazia Roncarolo, MD

Roncarolo, the George D. Smith Professor in Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, received the 2019 Translational Pioneer Award from Cell & Gene Therapy Insights. The award recognizes the contributions of her translational research studies, which have led to greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune tolerance in stem cell transplantation, and have been fundamental to the development of novel stem cell and gene therapies for patients with genetic and acquired diseases of the hematopoietic and immune systems.


Lisa Shieh, MD, PhD, and David Svec, MD, MBA

Shieh, clinical professor of medicine, and Svec, clinical assistant professor of medicine, received the Malinda Mitchell Award from Stanford Health Care for their work to decrease inappropriate use of intermediate intensive care unit level care. The award, which recognizes excellence in quality and service, is named for the former president and chief executive officer of Stanford Health Care.

Manpreet Singh, MD

Singh was promoted to associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Nov. 1. She directs the Stanford Pediatric Mood Disorders Program. Her work focuses on characterizing the origins and pathways for developing mood disorders, and conducting translational research to protect and preserve brain function after symptoms begin. In addition, she was selected to receive the 2019 American Psychiatry Association’s Blanche F. Ittleson Award, which includes a $2,000 honorarium and recognizes a psychiatrist whose work has had significant impact on child and adolescent psychiatry.


Joy Wu, MD, PhD

Wu, assistant professor of medicine, has joined the Endocrine Society’s leadership team as a member of its council. In her role representing basic science, she will work toward the society’s mission to promote optimal health by advancing endocrine science, education and care.


Matias Bruzoni, MD

Bruzoni was promoted to associate professor of surgery, effective Nov. 1. He directs the pediatric surgery fellowship and the Hispanic Center for Pediatric Surgery at Stanford Children’s Health. His research and clinical interests include minimally invasive surgery in neonates, weight loss surgery in adolescents, surgical oncology and inflammatory bowel disease.


Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD

Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was elected to the 2018 class of fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. Deisseroth pioneered optogenetics, a way of controlling cells with light, and hydrogel-tissue chemistry, a way of making biological tissues transparent and accessible for labeling and imaging biomolecules.


Donald Frush, MD

Frush was appointed professor of radiology, effective Nov. 1. His research centers on pediatric body computed tomography, including technology assessment, techniques for pediatric multidetector CT examinations, assessment of image quality, CT radiation dosimetry and risk communication.


Zihuai He, PhD

He was appointed assistant professor (research) of neurology and neurological sciences and of medicine, effective Nov. 1. His research focuses on statistical genetics and integrative analysis of -omics data, with an aim to develop methodologies for identifying and interpreting biological pathways involved in diseases, particularly neurological disorders. 


Peter Kim, PhD

Kim, the Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor of Biochemistry, received an Arthur Kornberg and Paul Berg Lifetime Achievement Award in Biomedical Sciences from the Stanford Medicine Alumni Association. The award recognizes the lifetime achievements of School of Medicine alumni in the biomedical sciences. After discovering how proteins cause viral membranes to fuse with cells, a process required for infection by many viruses, Kim designed molecules that stop membrane fusion by HIV and pioneered efforts to develop vaccines based on similar principles. He is continuing his efforts to create vaccines, including against HIV.


Nicholas Leeper, MD

Leeper, associate professor of surgery and of medicine, received the Falk Catalyst Research Award from the Dr. Ralph and Marian Falk Medical Research Trust. The award program provides one year of seed funding to support high-risk, high-reward projects that address critical scientific and therapeutic roadblocks. The $300,000 grant will fund his study of nanoparticles to stimulate efferocytosis, the process of clearing dead and diseased cells from atherosclerotic plaque with the goal of preventing heart attack and stroke.


Sergiu Pasca, MD

Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, won the 2018 Daniel H. Efron Research Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. The award, which includes $1,500, recognizes outstanding basic research contributions to neuropsychopharmacology. He was recognized for pioneering a way to create balls of human brain cells that mimic the architecture of the cerebral cortex and for uncovering mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders.


Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, PhD

Stirman was promoted to associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, effective Nov. 1. Her research focuses on developing and testing implementation strategies to facilitate the use of evidence-based psychosocial interventions in routine care settings.


Adam Wang, PhD

Wang was appointed assistant professor of radiology, effective Nov. 1. His research focuses on developing technologies for advanced X-ray and CT imaging, including novel system design, model-based image reconstruction, spectral imaging and radiation transport methods.


Monte Winslow, PhD

Winslow was promoted to associate professor of genetics and of pathology, effective Nov. 1. His research focuses on uncovering rules that govern tumor progression and metastasis, and discovering new therapeutic targets across the continuum of cancer progression, including the lethal metastatic stage.


Sherry Wren, MD

Wren, professor and vice chair of surgery, was the inaugural recipient of the #SheForShe award from Women in Surgery Africa for supporting the development of women surgeons in the region. WiSA is a membership group that provides support to female surgeons, surgeons in training and medical students in the 14 member countries of the College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa.


Of Note Archive

2021 ISSUE 2

Unlocking the secrets of the brain

COVID-19 Updates

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A dedicated page provides the latest information and developments related to the pandemic.