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  • Cancer disparities in Pacific Islanders

    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders experience poorer breast cancer survival outcomes that are hidden when their data is included in Asian populations, Stanford researcher says.

  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • Awards for promoting diversity

    An event at Stanford Hospital honors a school of medicine faculty member, a fellow and a student for their efforts to diversify the medical field and promote health equity.

  • Refining law on the definition of death

    Experts propose revising the legal and medical standard on declaring someone dead based on respiratory function and likelihood of consciousness rather than cessation of brain function.

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.

  • Garry Gold appointed chair of radiology

    Garry Gold, who specializes in understanding osteoarthritis via MRI, has been appointed chair of the Department of Radiology, embracing a vision of early disease detection.

  • How Stanford Medicine tackles opioid crisis

    At Stanford Medicine, programs to help patients struggling with substance-abuse disorders, research into addiction, and educational programs to increase awareness about addiction and treatment are aimed at reducing dependence on opioids.

  • Lisa Wise-Faberowski dies at 57

    Lisa Wise-Faberowski, who studied a rare congenital heart condition as well as the effects of anesthesia on children’s developing brains, died at 57.

  • Brain plasticity leads to worse seizures

    A brain mechanism needed for learning explains why epileptic seizures become more frequent, but a finding in rodents offers hope for treatment, according to a new study.

  • Marijuana can damage heart

    Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects.


2021 ISSUE 2

Unlocking the secrets of the brain

COVID-19 Updates

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A dedicated page provides the latest information and developments related to the pandemic.