2022

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Women’s and men’s brain patterns differ

    Stanford Medicine researchers have developed a powerful new artificial intelligence model that can distinguish between male and female brains.

  • Ketamine response may vary by sex

    A new study in rats led by Stanford Medicine researchers looked at whether ketamine’s effects depend on opioid pathways — and uncovered a surprising difference between males and females.

  • Ensuring science integrity

    At a convention on “future proofing” science, participants stressed that institutions can provide training, establish policies and create a culture that rewards rigorous and reproducible studies.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.

  • New guidelines suggested for liver cancer

    A Stanford Medicine study identifies an easily measured biophysical property that can identify Type 2 diabetics at increased risk for liver cancer who don’t meet current screening guidelines.

  • DNA shows Roman Empire migration

    The team led by Stanford Medicine analyzed thousands of genomes, including those newly sequenced from 204 skeletons, to gain insight into how and where people moved during the Roman Empire.

  • Telomeres lengthen with weight management

    Children with obesity in a six-month healthy eating and exercise program experienced increases in their average telomere length, suggesting reversal of premature aging, a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers found.

  • Inaugural Health Equity Symposium

    At the 2024 Health Equity Symposium, speakers emphasized that racism is alive and well, and workshop attendees identified ways to tackle health disparities.

  • AI helps manage Type 2 diabetes

    A new study led by Stanford Medicine indicates that an AI app can help Type 2 diabetic patients manage their blood glucose levels.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care