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  • AI tools take on soft tissue sarcomas

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare and difficult to treat. Machine-learning tools designed at Stanford Medicine uncover distinct cellular communities that correlate with prognosis, immunotherapy success.

  • $1 billion community investment

    Stanford Medicine invested $1.07 billion in funds and services during the 2023 fiscal year to bolster Bay Area communities.

  • Bengal cat coats not so wild after all

    Researchers studied hundreds of Bengal cats to uncover the genetic origins of their leopard-like patterns and found that their appearance stems largely from domesticated cats.

  • AI helps with patient emails

    Stanford Medicine study shows that large language models can lend a hand to clinicians in responding to patient email messages.

  • AI and medicine

    Leaders of Stanford Medicine discuss artificial intelligence in health and medicine; its usefulness in research, education and patient care; and how to responsibly integrate the technology.

  • Match Day 2024

    Nerves turn to celebration as Stanford School of Medicine students discover where they are headed for the final phase of their medical training.

  • Kids exposed to lead in water

    Researchers at Stanford Medicine and Johns Hopkins University estimate that some 129,000 children younger than 6 in Chicago have elevated levels of the neurotoxin in their blood due to lead pipes.

  • Drug ups production of anti-hunger molecule

    A Stanford Medicine study found that metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug associated with moderate weight loss, stimulates production of lac-phe, a molecule abundant after exercise.

  • Pugh a fellow at Joint Commission

    The Joint Commission, which accredits more than 22,000 health care organizations, awarded surgeon Carla Pugh the inaugural fellowship, during which she plans to develop a technology-driven process to support the organization’s work.

  • Microbiomes are personal

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues tracked the gut, mouth, nose and skin bacteria of 86 people for as long as six years to try to gauge what constitutes a healthy microbiome.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care