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  • Autopsy, morgue and decedent care

    Stanford Hospital brings together two autopsy rooms, the morgue and decedent care team offices. The new space allows for more advanced research and includes bereavement and viewing rooms for families.

  • Psychiatrist Craig Barr Taylor dies at 78

    Taylor, a Stanford Medicine professor emeritus, took a public health approach to mental health and was an early proponent of digital interventions for anxiety and eating disorders.

  • Drug treats vets’ PTSD and depression

    Stanford Medicine researchers find that ibogaine, a plant-based psychoactive compound, safely led to improvements in depression, anxiety and functioning among veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

  • Brain stimulation can improve hypnotizability

    Stanford Medicine scientists used transcranial magnetic stimulation to temporarily enhance hypnotizability in patients with chronic pain, making them better candidates for hypnotherapy.

  • 2023’s top scientific advancements

    Reflecting on the past year, the editors and writers of the Office of Communications picked some of the most significant scientific achievements they covered at Stanford Medicine in 2023.

  • Tachycardia unraveled

    Researchers engineered stem cell-derived heart tissues to study how tachycardia affects the heart and to uncover the inner workings of our body’s engine.

  • AI’s promise, pitfalls

    Leaders from health care, industry and government convened virtually to find ways to ensure artificial intelligence improves care for caregivers as well as patients.

  • Smartwatches diagnose kids’ arrhythmias

    Apple watches have some advantages over traditional ways of diagnosing cardiac arrhythmias in children but need more validation, finds a Stanford Medicine study.

  • Tumor DNA levels in blood predict outcome

    Circulating tumor DNA predicts recurrence and splits disease into two subgroups in Stanford Medicine-led study of Hodgkin lymphoma. New drug targets or changes in treatments may reduce toxicity.

  • Anatomical gift memorial service

    An event to commemorate body donations, “the priceless gift of generosity,” previously only open to faculty, staff and students, is now open to the donors’ loved ones.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care