06

  • Gene therapy for neurologic disease

    Experts at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health helped conduct clinical trials for the new therapy, which gives kids with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, a functioning copy of the abnormal gene.

  • Customizable AI tool aids pathologists

    The artificial intelligence technology can be trained by pathologists, giving them personalized assistance in identifying cells that might indicate diseases such as cancer or endometritis.

  • ‘Optimism is simply the better choice’

    At the graduation ceremony, Minor encouraged the Class of 2024 to choose optimism in their careers: “Create the best out of any situation and be the light that leads others.”…

  • Graduation emphasizes personal growth

    Speakers at the ceremony that awarded PhD, MD and master’s degrees encourage students to adopt optimism, listen to their muse and dance to their own beat.

  • Blood pressure drug may prevent epilepsy

    In an analysis of more than 2 million patient records, researchers discovered that people taking angiotensin receptor blockers for high blood pressure were less likely to develop epilepsy.

  • Study reveals six depression subtypes

    Brain imaging, known as functional MRI, combined with machine learning can predict a treatment response based on one’s depression “biotype.”…

  • Low risk of cancer after CAR-T therapy

    In April, the FDA warned of risk of secondary cancers in people receiving CAR-T cell therapy. A large Stanford Medicine study finds the risk is low and not related to the CAR-T cells.

  • No Paxlovid benefit seen for long COVID

    Paxlovid, effective in preventing severe COVID-19, didn’t appear to help long-COVID patients in this single-center study. But further research may show benefits with different doses or for people with specific symptoms.

  • Williams receives $18 million NIH grant

    Professor of psychiatry and behavioral health Leanne Williams will lead a project to define depression’s cognitive biotypes and create tools for clinicians to diagnose and treat patients.

  • Howard Chang awarded Lurie Prize

    The professor of dermatology and genetics was honored with the 2024 Lurie Prize for his studies into the role of long noncoding RNA in health and disease.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers